US air strike obliterates 13 al-Shabab terrorists in Somalia

US air strike obliterates 13 al-Shabab terrorists in Somalia

US air strike obliterates 13 al-Shabab terrorists in Somalia just days after bombing four jihadists who attacked Somali forces, local army officials say

  • The strike took place in the Hiiran region of central Somalia on Sunday and was first reported by state-owned national TV, according to Bloomberg 
  • This is the second strike against al-Shabab this week, as US Africa Command confirmed that they’d killed four members of the terrorist group on August 9 
  • No American military or civilian officials have yet to confirm the Sunday strike in Somalia 
  • US military forces have been active in the region under President Joe Biden, after former President Donald Trump had ordered a withdrawal 

Local Somalian officials confirmed Sunday that an air strike from American forces killed 13 members of the al-Shabab Islamist terrorist group in the country.

The strike took place in the Hiiran region of central Somalia on Sunday and was first reported by state-owned national TV, according to Bloomberg.

This is the second strike against al-Shabab fighters this week, as US Africa Command confirmed that they’d killed four members of the terrorist group on August 9.

No American military or civilian officials have yet to confirm the Sunday strike in Somalia.  

US military forces have been active in the region under President Joe Biden, after former President Donald Trump had ordered a withdrawal. 

Local Somalian officials confirmed Sunday that an air strike from American forces killed 13 members of the al-Shabab Islamist terrorist group (pictured) in the country

The strike took place in the Hiiran region of central Somalia on Sunday and was first reported by state-owned national TV, according to Bloomberg

This is the second strike against al-Shabab fighters this week, as US Africa Command confirmed that they’d killed four members of the terrorist group on August 9

This also comes amid further changes for the American military in the region.

Marine General Michael Langley took over as the top U.S. commander for Africa on Tuesday, heading U.S. military operations on a continent with some of the most active and dangerous insurgent groups and a relatively small Pentagon footprint.

Langley, who made history on Saturday when he became the first African American in the Marine Corps to be promoted to four-star general, took over U.S. Africa Command in a ceremony at Kelley Barracks in Stuttgart, Germany. 

He is the second African American to lead the command, which has about 6,000-7,000 troops across the continent.

Speaking at the ceremony, the outgoing commander, Army Gen. Stephen Townsend, noted the often limited troops and resources allocated to the continent. 

Somalias newly appointed Minister of Religious Affairs Muktar Robow Abu-Mansur, the former al-Shabab commander

Marine General Michael Langley took over as the top U.S. commander for Africa on Tuesday, heading U.S. military operations on a continent with some of the most active and dangerous insurgent groups and a relatively small Pentagon footprint 

‘There is a new challenge every day and we don’t have resources to throw at those challenges. So we have to think,’ said Townsend, who is retiring after 40 years in the military. 

‘America cannot afford to ignore Africa. The continent is full of potential but it’s also full of challenges and it’s standing at a historic crossroads.’

For years, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, turmoil in the Middle East, a greater focus on an increasingly combative and competitive China and the recent war in Ukraine have dominated the Pentagon’s attention. 

But insurgent groups, including al-Qaida and Islamic State militants, flourish in ungoverned spaces in Africa, a nd al-Shabab continues to be a significant threat in Somalia.

On Tuesday, Austin noted that decision, saying that the persistent U.S. military presence to train and assist Somali forces is crucial as al-Shabab’s attacks on civilians grow more lethal and brazen.

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