UK funeral firm offering to drop the ashes of loved-ones by drone

UK funeral firm offering to drop the ashes of loved-ones by drone

Heavens above! UK firm offers grieving relatives the chance to have their loved one’s ashes scattered by DRONE

  • Co-Op Funeralcare is teaming up with experienced RAF pilot Christopher Mace
  • Mr Mace, 56, runs Aerial Ashes, a company which carries out the ash scattering
  • He has obtained permission from the Civil Aviation Authority for his drone flights
  • He told The Telegraph he has already carried out more than 50 drops so far 

A funeral company is offering to scatter people’s ashes over land and sea – using a drone.

In what is said to be a UK first, Co-op Funeralcare will offer grieving relatives the option of having their loved-one’s ashes scattered from the sky.

Four-propeller machines will lift the ashes in a large black box, fly it to a certain point and then dispense the ashes.

The funeral firm says the unique service will allow families to reach less accessible places such as rivers, sports facilities or beauty spots. 

Christopher Mace, a retired RAF helicopter pilot, has partnered with Co-Op Funeralcare to provide the ash scattering service.

The 56-year-old was inspired to found his company – Aerial Ashes – after scattering the remains of ex-service personnel at sea during his time in the forces.

Speaking of the launch, Gill Stewart, MD of Co-op Funeralcare said: ‘Cremation has continued to grow at pace as a choice for funerals.

In what is said to be a UK first, Co-op Funeralcare will offer grieving relatives the option of having their loved-one’s ashes scattered from the sky

Christopher Mace, a retired RAF helicopter pilot, has partnered with Co-Op Funeralcare to provide the ash scattering service.

The 56-year-old was inspired to found his company – Aerial Ashes – after scattering the remains of ex-service personnel at sea during his time in the forces

‘We’re always looking at new and innovative ways to help families honour their loved one’s not just through the funeral service, but also through uniquely personal commemorative options for their ashes.

‘Our colleagues are dedicated to supporting the bereaved families we serve long after the funeral and the sky really is the limit now in terms of the choices that are available.

‘Cremation has continued to grow at pace as a choice for funerals. We’re always looking at new and innovative ways to help families honour their loved one’s not just through the funeral service, but also through uniquely personal commemorative options for their ashes.’ 

In order to complete the drops, Mr Mace, a pilot who has completed tours of Afghanistan, Northern Ireland, the Falklands and Cyprus with the RAF, said he needed a license from the Civil Aviation Authority.

In order to complete the drops, Mr Mace said he needed a license from the Civil Aviation Authority. Pictured: One of the drops above the sea

Mr Mace also needs permission from landowners to carry out the drops. He told The Telegraph that he has already performed 50 flights since launching his firm. Pictured: A drop above a field

Drone licenses are required to fly any large drone – over 250g – in the UK. More advanced licenses are needed for commercial use. 

Mr Mace also needs permission from landowners to carry out the drops. He told The Telegraph that he has already performed 50 flights since launching his firm.

He told the paper that most of the drops had been at sea, with views of the a beach among his most popular requests, followed by private forest areas.

He also told The Telegraph that he had recently performed two drops in one – which he referred to as a ‘double scattering’ – of a mother and a father in a field in Wiltshire.

Mr Mace, who lives in Stokesley, North Yorks, said: ‘Drones are increasingly being viewed a means of providing essential services in our society.’

Mr Mace (pictured) is a pilot who has completed tours of Afghanistan, Northern Ireland, the Falklands and Cyprus with the RAF

Mr Mace also needs permission from landowners to carry out the drops. He told The Telegraph that he has already performed 50 flights since launching his firm

‘With investment in creating drone superhighways being looked at as this technology use grows.

‘The use of drones to provide new options to scatter ashes is an emerging and unique way that this technology can offer a truly memorable service.

‘Ensuring that the right permissions are sought is essential and weather conditions must be favourable, but the use of a drone alleviates much of the worry when families want to scatter ashes in otherwise hard to reach locations.’

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