Sadiq Khan blames MPs for 'provoking' unions into strike action

Sadiq Khan blames MPs for 'provoking' unions into strike action

Sadiq Khan blames MPs for ‘deliberately provoking’ unions into strike action as London is crippled by yet another 24-hour rail walkout

  • Commuters are told to face disruption if they so travel into the office, so millions are expected to stay at home
  • Retail workers tell of ‘nightmare journeys’ including pricey Ubers, early starts and three bus commutes
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan has blamed the Government for ‘deliberately provoking’ unions into strike action
  • Businesses also suffer due to staff shortages and cancellations amounting to thousands of pounds
  • Most Tube lines are not running any service, with stations closed or empty, while bus routes are limited too
  • It comes after a widespread walkout on rail services yesterday which saw only 50 per cent of lines running

London Mayor Sadiq Khan has blamed MPs for ‘deliberately provoking’ unions into strike action as the capital’s transport is crippled with around one in five services running.

Friday has seen Londoners not able to travel on the Underground after Transport for London (TfL) workers represented by the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) staged a mass walk-out over issues including jobs and pensions, affecting tube and bus services across the capital. 

A new survey found that while more than 70 per cent of Britons have opted to work from home, retail and hospitality workers have been forced to either skip out on a day’s pay or wake up early and make long and arduous journeys across the capital to get to work.

Approximately 10,000 members of the RMT union are striking in a 24-hour walkout, 1,100 members of the Unite union are striking on the Underground, Victoria Coach station and Croydon Tramlink, and 400 London Overground workers employed by Arriva Rail London are taking part in a separate walkout.

Bus drivers for United London are doing the same, which is affecting 57 routes through west London, south west London and parts of Surrey. 

Mr Khan said of the Strikes on Friday: ‘The way the Government is behaving, it’s almost like they’re deliberately provoking strikes across the country, not just in the transport sector but in other sectors, as a precursor for legislation to curtail the rights of trade unions to go on strike,’ he told the Evening Standard.

He also said on Thursday that the Tube strike is being caused by workers’ concerns about the impact of a funding deal from the Government.

‘The way to reward them is not by having draconian conditions that change their pensions unilaterally.’

RMT boss Mick Lynch has threatened to strike into the winter until a settlement is reached – and if this happens at a time when energy bills are rising, it will quickly become extremely expensive to work from home.

Business leaders have similarly blasted the ‘catastrophic’ TfL strikes hammering the nation’s ‘already fragile’ retail and hospitality sectors – hitting low-paid staff ‘disproportionately hard’ while better-paid office workers simply login at home. 

As more than 70 per cent of Britons have opted to work from home,` according to a new survey, retail and hospitality workers have been forced to either skip out on a day’s pay or wake up early and make long and arduous journeys across the capital to get to work. 

The Confederation of British Industry (CBI) blasted the industrial action for creating ‘additional hardship’ for those unable to work from home. 

‘Continued strikes will have serious consequences for people and businesses throughout the UK,’ a spokesperson told the MailOnline.    

‘They will create additional hardship for those unable to work from home, further harm struggling sectors like hospitality, events and aviation, and have a damaging impact throughout an economy teetering on the brink of recession.’

 Friday has seen Londoners not able to travel on the Underground after Transport for London (TfL) workers represented by the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) staged a mass walk-out over issues including jobs and pensions, affecting tube and bus services across the capital (pictured outside Liverpool Street Station today)

A new survey found that while more than 70 per cent of Britons have opted to work from home, retail and hospitality workers have been forced to either skip out on a day’s pay or wake up early and make long and arduous journeys across the capital to get to work (pictured, Victoria station closed today)

London Mayor Sadiq Khan (pictured) has blamed MPs for ‘deliberately provoking’ unions into strike action as the capital’s transport is crippled with around one in five services running

Commuters are seen waiting for buses at Liverpool Street station this morning as the tube strike hits the capital

The only lines running at all, still with a severely limited service, are the Central, District, DLR, Overground and Northern lines

People at major London bus stops are already looking tired and desperate as they try to navigate the capital’s limited transport services

Kate Nicholls, chief executive of UKHospitality, slammed the strikes for the impact their adverse impact on hospitality workers. 

‘The very nature of hospitality demands an ‘in person’ experience, so the strikes clearly hit our already fragile sector disproportionately hard.’

Dee Coris, chief operating officer at the New West End Company, said the strike action was ‘a particular blow for workers who need to continue commuting into the capital, alongside retail and hospitality businesses in the district that are already struggling with rising costs.’

Among those disproportionately affected by today’s strikes was Angela Gonzalez, 22-year-old, a shop manager at Orée on High Street Kensington, who told the MailOnline she had no choice but to get an Uber to work.

She said: ‘I had to take an Uber which is expensive, like triple the normal price. That was £27, usually it’s just under £10 going here.’

She continued: ‘It frustrates me. You have to leave early, there’s not many buses coming and sometimes the buses are packed so they don’t stop.

‘Some of the roads are closed as well’.

Commuters wait for bus services outside Waterloo Station on Friday as the coordinated bus and tube strikes take hold. Severe transport disruption is expected across the capital today, with TfL urging people to not travel unless essential

Alice Locacelli, 35, a supervisor at the retailer Muji, said the strikes were ‘really stressful’ as her usual journey of just over an hour took more than double that.

Ms Locacelli, who travelled on two buses from Hendon to central London, said: ‘It’s not a good day when the strikes are happening.

The strikes are ‘really affecting people that are [on] low wages and need to go to work,’ she continued. 

‘If I’m at home, I’m not going to get paid. It’s really stressful, I’ve been thinking about this for two days’.

Rail staff walked out yesterday, closing down a fifth of the network. But both strikes have simply meant millions of white collar commuters will simply work from home, while blue collar workers have their journeys hampered.

A new survey has suggested more than 70 per cent of Britons have chosen to work from home during this year’s rail strikes. 

The survey, carried out by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), showed that around 13 per cent of adults in Britain questioned between August 3 and 14 said the strikes had disrupted their plans.




Of those who said they had been affected, just 4 per cent said they had been unable to work, 4 per cent had been unable to attend a medical appointment and 2 per cent said they had been unable to care for friends or family.

A higher proportion, 39 per cent, said they had been unable to take part in leisure activities, such as going to a restaurant or cinema.

The ONS also asked adults who normally travel to work by train what they would do if they were unable to travel in that way. A total of 71 per cent respondents said they could work from home.

But many key workers who cannot work from home, such as NHS and other emergency service staff, face turmoil this morning as roads are quickly building up with traffic too. 

Retail and hospitality workers are also face either battling into work or losing out on pay – which in the cost of living crisis could be vital to staying afloat. 

Clarks shoe shop on High Street Kensington (pictured) was forced to delay its opening time for two hours ‘due to tube strike disruption’

Five Guys on High Street Kensington (pictured) was less busy than usual on Friday morning, and the store’s deputy general manager said they were dealing with staff shortages due to the industrial action

Ahmed Bouhalla, 25, a sales assistant at Clarks, said he had ‘no choice’ but to take three buses from Enfield in north London to get to the shoe shop.

‘My job involves physical interaction with customers so I have to come in,’ he explained.

Meanwhile, other businesses are being hit by staff shortages as some are forced to miss out on day’s pay due to long and complicated journeys which make it near-impossible to come in.  

Vaida Siaudvytyte, 32, who is the deputy general manager at the Five Guys on High Street Kensington, said she was dealing with reduced staff numbers due to the strikes.

She said: ‘Already two people didn’t come in so we had to call someone from the later shift to come early.

‘Office people can work from home but all the food businesses, retail businesses, shops, they cannot work from home’. 

Michael Kill, chief executive of the Night Time Industries Association, told the MailOnline that the strike action is ‘catastrophic’ for those who work in the night time economy including bars, restaurants and clubs.

He said: ‘Our industry is suffering heavily from rising costs, as inflation reaches a high, with most reporting an estimated loss of up to 40 per cent in trade from the previous strike action, and unions announcing this morning that strikes could go on indefinitely is hugely concerning for the hospitality and late night sector.’

‘Long term strike action would be catastrophic.

‘Sporadic weekly or daily planned strike action is eating into consumer confidence, hospitality and late night sector workforce who aren’t able to work from home are struggling to find safe alternative transport at night at additional cost.

‘The current operating climate will lead to irreparable damage without Government intervention, leading to loss of businesses and jobs, slowing recovery.’

Meanwhile, Tony Matharu, founder and chairman of Blue Orchid Hotels, said the chain of London hotels had ‘experienced over £500,000 of cancellations since the strikes were first announced’.

He said: ‘So many of us are frustrated and immensely disappointed that a fragile economic recovery has now been interrupted by the breakdown in talks and industrial action planned for this week.

‘In London we are dependent on a mobile workforce and this is of fundamental importance for the hospitality sector and the night time economy.

‘Uncertainty is extremely unhelpful to all concerned. We have experienced over £500,000 of cancellations since the strikes were first announced. There is no guarantee that we will be able to recover these losses.’ 

Asked by Sky News if compulsory redundancies were on the table for rail workers, Mr Shapps said: ‘The deal that is on the table actually means largely no compulsory redundancies at all.

‘If (the unions) are not prepared to put that deal to your membership we will never know whether members would accept it.

‘What I do know and I can say for sure is if we can’t get this settled in the way that we are proposing, which is ‘please put the deal to your membership’ then we will have to move to what is called a section 188; it is a process of actually requiring these changes to go into place so it becomes mandated.

‘That is the direction that this is moving in now.’

‘Under Section 188 of the Trade Union Act bosses can ignore consultation with unions about redundancies if  ‘special circumstances render it not reasonably practicable for the employer to comply’.

Defending the action on Friday, Mick Lynch, general secretary of the RMT said members’ pensions are at risk.

‘We haven’t gotten an agreement. There’s also threats to terms and conditions. We wanted a promise that terms and conditions won’t be diluted and there is a threat of a loss of jobs in certain sections of the Underground.’

The latest update from this morning shows that only the Central, District, DLR, Overground and Northern lines are running any service at all, and even on these lines the service is severely reduced.

Many Tube stations are empty or completely closed this morning (August 19)

London Underground trains are laid up at Northfields Train Depot in west London as the tube strike begins this morning

Commuters are being warned to expect severe delays and disruption to their journeys, with some being advised to not travel at all.

Buses are also severely affected as staff stage a coordinated walkout to cripple the capital, with 63 routes affected.  

Meanwhile national rail services are expected to remain disrupted today after a strike yesterday left only half of the UK’s railway lines running.

Just 70 per cent of services will run across Friday as a whole and 85 per cent capacity tomorrow (Saturday, August 19).

Similarly a knock-on effect will also affect Tube services in days to come.

Members of the RMT Union on the London Underground have walked out for 24 hours over an ongoing jobs and pensions dispute.

In total, around 10,000 tube workers in the union are expected to be taking part in the strike, causing chaos in the capital and causing commuter woe for millions.

Nick Dent, TfL’s director of customer operations said it was going to be a ‘difficult day’ for travel in the capital.

‘We’re advising customers not to travel on the Tube at all,’ he said.   

TfL is warning customers to prepare for ‘severe disruption on all lines’ and ‘little to no services throughout the day. No Night Tube.’

‘Avoid travel on the Tube if possible and only travel on the rest of the network if essential,’ it adds.

‘If you need to travel, river services, London Cable Car and Santander Cycles will be available to help you get around.’ It also reminds visitors that much of Zone 1 London is walkable.

The tube network is set to resume on 8am on Saturday but there is some knock-on disruption expected into the weekend.

Asked by Sky News if compulsory redundancies were on the table for rail workers, Mr Shapps said: ‘The deal that is on the table actually means largely no compulsory redundancies at all.

‘If (the unions) are not prepared to put that deal to your membership we will never know whether members would accept it.

‘What I do know and I can say for sure is if we can’t get this settled in the way that we are proposing, which is ‘please put the deal to your membership’ then we will have to move to what is called a section 188; it is a process of actually requiring these changes to go into place so it becomes mandated.

‘That is the direction that this is moving in now.’

‘Under Section 188 of the Trade Union Act bosses can ignore consultation with unions about redundancies if  ‘special circumstances render it not reasonably practicable for the employer to comply’.

Commuters wait at a bus stop outside London Liverpool Street Station on Friday morning as a walkout of TfL workers comes into effect across the capital

The latest update from this morning shows that only the Central, District, DLR, Overground and Northern lines are running any service at all, and even on these lines the service is severely reduced.

Commuters are being warned to expect severe delays and disruption to their journeys, with some being advised to not travel at all.

Buses are also severely affected as staff stage a coordinated walkout to cripple the capital, with 63 routes affected.

Hordes of commuters queue to board a bus outside London Liverpool Street Station (pictured) on Friday morning. Travel disruption hits the capital after a walkout of TfL workers over a long-running row about jobs and pensions

Meanwhile national rail services are expected to remain disrupted today after a strike yesterday left only half of the UK’s railway lines running.

Just 70 per cent of services will run across Friday as a whole and 85 per cent capacity tomorrow (Saturday, August 19).

Similarly a knock-on effect will also affect Tube services in days to come.

Members of the RMT Union on the London Underground have walked out for 24 hours over an ongoing jobs and pensions dispute.

In total, around 10,000 tube workers in the union are expected to be taking part in the strike, causing chaos in the capital and causing commuter woe for millions.

Figures from location technology firm TomTom show a sharp rise in road congestion in London on Friday due to the Tube strike.

At 9am, the congestion level was 40 per cent, compared with 26 per cent at the same time last week.

The figures represent the proportion of additional time required for journeys compared with free-flow conditions. 

Heavy traffic could be seen building up on Euston Road in Central London on Friday afternoon as many took to their cars to avoid public transport during the industrial action

Standstill traffic was seen in central London on Friday afternoon as many tried to make their way home amid the industrial action staged by TfL 

And later in the afternoon, heavy traffic could be seen building up on Euston Road in Central London as many took to their cars to avoid public transport during the industrial action.

Yesterday members of the public enthusiastically thanked Mick Lynch, head of the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers, for the industrial action, saying he had saved them money and given them a lie-in.

Since the pandemic, a much larger proportion of the UK workforce can now work from home, meaning bringing transport to a standstill no longer has the same effect. 

Members of Unite at London Underground, Croydon Tramlink, Victoria coach station, Dial-a-Ride and river service will also join them and walk out on Friday.

During the last London Tube strike, a few lines or some sections of lines ran a reduced service, and trains stopped every 15 to 20minutes. Elsewhere, whole lines and branches of lines were closed or part-suspended, leaving millions of commuters stranded.

Usually more than 500 trains are running on the Underground network at any one time. 

But rail strikes yesterday failed to have the desired effect, leading to doubt over how big an impact will be seen on the London transport network.

Live traffic data showed a spike in congestion levels in London of around 75% at around 5pm yesterday, compared to around 40% at the same time on Wednesday. 

Figures provided by TomTom show that traffic in Manchester was around 65% at 5pm yesterday – up from 55% on Wednesday – while data from 9am today in the same cities had only risen slightly compared to yesterday.

And many workers are in fact celebrating the strike, claiming it is a welcome break from early starts and paying for ever more expensive commuting.

But not all employees have that option – staff in the service industries, NHS workers such as nurses and care staff will all face travelling to work to keep the country running.

Some are facing huge costs or journey times in an effort to get to work, resorting to taxis or having to spend hours on disrupted buses.

An almost empty Central Line carriage is seen this morning as the tube strike by workers wreaks havoc, causing misery for commuters 

People are seen waiting for a number 16 bus outside Victoria Station this morning as the tube strike forced commuters to seek alternative routes to their destinations 

Scores of people are seen waiting for buses outside Victoria Station today as the tube strike forced them to look for alternative routes to work 

A graphic of strike action across the network in London and the UK across this weekend, produced by TfL. Red means there is no service or severe disruption, orange is a reduced/ or irregular service and green means a good service is running. Passengers are advised to check their journeys before they travel 

Transport is already building up as rail and bus services are cancelled (Pictured: Traffic queues on the A102M Blackwall Tunnel approach in Greenwich in South East London this morning)

Some on Twitter even said they would be able to enjoy the sunshine as the heatwave which has been scorching Britain this summer starts to taper off – and could even watch football while they work.

Some bus services will be suspended for 48 hours from today. Services affected are in Fulwell, Hounslow, Park Royal, Shepherd’s Bush, Stamford Brook and Tolworth. 

Heritage train company to launch service to aid frustrated commuters 

A heritage train company is launching a charter service between London and the North West to help passengers frustrated by Avanti West Coast’s severe disruption.

Crewe-based Locomotive Services Group will begin operating a first class-only charter service to and from London Euston on Friday.

The train’s air-conditioned carriages are restored British Rail Mark 3 stock with three-abreast seating, tables, power points and large windows.

The service will only operate on Fridays, and will run at 110mph using electric locomotives. It will depart from Crewe at 2.29pm, running non-stop to arrive at London Euston at 4.12pm.

The train will set off to return north at 5.27pm, calling at Birmingham International, Birmingham New Street, Wolverhampton, Stafford, Crewe and Wilmslow before arriving at Manchester Piccadilly at 8.45pm.

Passengers can travel ‘in comfort and style without the stress of normal rail services’, according to the operator.

It added: ‘Say goodbye to packed commuter trains and hello to luxurious legroom and cushioned comfort.’

Fares cost £75 each way.

Around 1,600 bus drivers are involved in the industrial action over the weekend, causing disrupting in west and south west London and parts of Surrey on both days.

Today the Transport Minister told Sky News that railway reforms will be imposed if workers do not agree to new deals.

Asked if compulsory redundancies were on the table for rail workers, Grant Shapps said: ‘The deal that is on the table actually means largely no compulsory redundancies at all.

‘If (the unions) are not prepared to put that deal to your membership we will never know whether members would accept it.

‘What I do know and I can say for sure is if we can’t get this settled in the way that we are proposing, which is ‘please put the deal to your membership’ then we will have to move to what is called a section 188; it is a process of actually requiring these changes to go into place so it becomes mandated.

‘That is the direction that this is moving in now.’

Mr Shapps claimed that outdated work practices needed to be updated, adding: ‘If we can’t get those modernisations in place we will have to impose those modernisations but we would much rather do it through these offers actually being put to their members.’

The RMT has claimed that TfL is having secret negotiations with the Government about cutting jobs and pensions.

However, TfL’s director of customer operations Nick Dent said the transport body has been working with ministers ‘all the way through the pandemic to try to secure a long-term funding settlement for London’. 

He told Sky News: ‘We of course conduct those negotiations confidentially. They are market-sensitive. We’ve explained that very clearly to the trade unions.

‘But we have been working with all of the trade unions, including the RMT, we’ve been very open and transparent about the impact of the pandemic on our finances all the way through the last couple of years.  

‘We’ve assured them that we’ll continue to keep them updated.

‘But, importantly, we have assured them that there are no proposals currently to change the TfL pension scheme, and if there were proposals in the future, then of course they will be consulted in detail. 

‘They’ll be involved very closely.’

Meanwhile, Labour former shadow chancellor John McDonnell has given his backing to a 10 per cent pay rise for all public sector workers in order to avoid future strikes.

Pressed about how to pay for the increases, the Hayes and Harlington MP said: ‘My view is we should follow what the Conservatives did in the 1950s in a similar crisis where they introduced an excess profits tax so that then you had the money coming in to enable people to have decent wages and proper public services.’

He also said Labour should be supporting industrial action ‘when necessary’ to help people who are struggling.

In Fulwell, the 33, 65, 71, 85, 281, 290, 371, 481, 671, 681, K3, N33 and N65 services will be affected.

In Hounslow, 110, 111, 117, 203, 419, E1, H22, H32, H37 and H98 route will be impacted.

Elsewhere, the 105, 116, 216, 400, 411, 423, 635, 663, 696, 697, KU1, KU2 and KU3 will be affected by strike action in Hounslow Heath.

The 18, 220, 223, 224, 258, 266, 440, N18 and N266 services are not expected to run in Park Royal.

Meanwhile, the 49, 70, 72, 94, 148, C1 and N72 services in Shepherd’s Bush and the 9, 211, 272, 283, E3, H91 and N9 buses in Stamford Brook will be affected.

And in Tolworth, the 265, 293, 404, 406, 418, 465, 467, 470, 613, 662, 665, K1, K2, K4, K5 and S3 services will see a knock on affect.

No night bus services will run on any of the routes either.

TfL Tube, London bus and UK train strike dates: Travel advice and everything you need to know as thousands of RMT workers walk out and Britons work from home to avoid chaos

By Gemma Parry for MailOnline 

The summer of rail strikes continues this week, with train services crippled by the industrial action which has seen just one in five trains running today.

Stations across the country are being affected by the ongoing strike action, which has now seeped into the London Underground network, with a Tube strike set to send the capital into chaos today. 

A knock-on effect is also expected in the days following the strikes, with service levels set for only 70 per cent capacity on Friday and 85 per cent on Sunday. 

The strike action means only half of the railway lines across Britain operated yesterday.  

In recent months, stations across Scotland and Wales have been left completely cut off by the crippling strikes and service levels have drastically dropped as workers protest over their pay. 

Here, MailOnline takes a look at how the rail strike could impact you, the next potential action on the horizon and why workers have walked out. 

Network Rail issued this map showing the expected services on routes across Britain on Saturday

EUSTON: RMT chief Mick Lynch stands on a picket line outside Euston station raising a fist with rail workers today

When is the next TfL Tube Strike? 

The Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers’ Union (RMT) have announced there will be a tube strike on Friday August 19. 

Members of the RMT Union on the London Underground will walk out for 24 hours over an ongoing jobs and pensions dispute. 

In total, around 10,000 tube workers in the union are expected to be taking part in the strike, causing chaos in the capital and causing commuter woe for millions. 

TfL has said that customers should prepare for ‘severe disruption on all lines’ and ‘little to no services throughout the day. No Night Tube.’

‘Avoid travel on the Tube if possible and only travel on the rest of the network if essential,’ it adds.

‘If you need to travel, river services, London Cable Car and Santander Cycles will be available to help you get around.’ It also reminds visitors that much of Zone 1 London is walkable.

The tube network is set to resume on 8am on Saturday but there is some knock-on disruption expected into the weekend.  

Which lines will be affected? 

All Tube lines are expected to be affected by the industrial action, including the Overground network. 

Bosses say lines on the Overground will run sparsely or not at all throughout Friday. 

Members of Unite at London Underground, Croydon Tramlink, Victoria coach station, Dial-a-Ride and river service will also join them and walk out on Friday.

During the last London Tube strike, a few lines or some sections of lines ran a reduced service, and trains stopped every 15 to 20minutes. Elsewhere, whole lines and branches of lines were closed or part-suspended, leaving millions of commuters stranded. 

A poster displaying information at Waterloo Station in London ahead of the strike action tomorrow 

Striking RMT members and their local supporters stand on the picket line at Wimbledon station

People looking at the departures board at Waterloo Station in London ahead of strike action set to cause chaos in the capital tomorrow 

Members of the RMT stand on a picket line outside Manchester Piccadilly train station

Commuters are being urged to use alternative modes of transport if possible and keep up to fate with delays or service suspensions on the TfL website. 

On either side of the strike on Friday, UK-wide strikes by RMT Union members have caused chaos. 

On Saturday, regional services going into and out of London will be affected by UK-wide strikes and there will be a reduced service between 8am and 6pm on the London Overground, a reduced service on the Elizabeth Line and a reduced service on the District line, with no service between Wimbledon and Parson’s Green, and Richmond and Turnham Green before 8am and after 6pm. 

The Bakerloo Line will also be affected with no service north of Queen’s Park.  

Will there also be a bus strike? 

 Some buses will suspend their services on Friday and Saturday as part of a 48-hour walkout. 

Around 1,600 bus drivers are involved in the industrial action over the weekend, causing disrupting in west and south west London and parts of Surrey on both days. 

In Fulwell, the 33, 65, 71, 85, 281, 290, 371, 481, 671, 681, K3, N33 and N65 services will be affected. 

In Hounslow, 110, 111, 117, 203, 419, E1, H22, H32, H37 and H98 route will be impacted. 

Elsewhere, the 105, 116, 216, 400, 411, 423, 635, 663, 696, 697, KU1, KU2 and KU3 will be affected by strike action in Hounslow Heath

The 18, 220, 223, 224, 258, 266, 440, N18 and N266 services are not expected to run in Park Royal

Meanwhile, the 49, 70, 72, 94, 148, C1 and N72 services  in Shepherd’s Bush and the 9, 211, 272, 283, E3, H91 and N9 buses in Stamford Brook will be affected. 

And in Tolworth, the 265, 293, 404, 406, 418, 465, 467, 470, 613, 662, 665, K1, K2, K4, K5 and S3 services will see a knock on affect. 

No night bus services will run on any of the routes either.  

When is the next National Rail strike? 

There will be strikes across the rail network on Saturday following on from the strikes held today.   

Services including Network Rail, Chiltern Railways, Cross Country Trains, Greater Anglia, LNER, East Midlands Railway, c2c, Great Western Railway, Northern Trains, South Eastern, South Western Railway Transpennie Express, Avanti West Coast, West Midlands Trains and GTR (including Gatwick Express) are set to be affected by action on Saturday. 

Jeremy Corbyn (left), Zarah Sultana, MP for Coventry South and Mick Lynch, General Secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) (right) on the picket line outside London Euston train station

WATERLOO STATION: A message board warns of travel disruption at Waterloo Station in London

Mr Corbyn, Ms Sultana and Mr Lynch were with protestors at Euston, London today (Thursday)  

Members of the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) are also being balloted for strike action at West Midlands Trains, Great Western Railway, Greater Anglia and TransPennine Express

The same services were impacted by strike action today.  

Members of the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) are also being balloted for strike action at West Midlands Trains, Great Western Railway, Greater Anglia and TransPennine Express. 

Southeastern will also be hit by the TSSA strikes with stations including Victoria Charing Cross, Cannon Street, London St Pancras, Dover Priory, Ramsgate, Ashford International, Dartford and Sevenoaks likely to be affected. 

Train operators have released plans for have the services will be impacted during Saturday’s strike. Trains will only operate between 7.30am and 6.30pm on both strike days and will start later than normal on the following mornings. 

Operators have laid out the following plans for this coming weekend.  

Avanti West Coast  The operator has been running a reduced timetable since Sunday due to many drivers no longer volunteering to work on their rest days for extra pay. On strike days there will be one train per hour in both directions between London Euston and each of Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester and Preston. A limited service will operate to Glasgow. Several areas will not be served, such as Blackpool, Edinburgh, North Wales and Shrewsbury.

c2c  It will operate fewer than a third of normal services. These will consist of two trains per hour in each direction between London Fenchurch Street and Shoeburyness via Laindon, and the same frequency between London Fenchurch Street and Pitsea via Rainham. No trains will run via Ockendon or Chafford Hundred.

Caledonian Sleeper  All departures are cancelled for last night, tonight and Friday night.

Chiltern Railways  No trains will run north of High Wycombe or Aylesbury due to the combination of planned engineering work and the strike. There will be two trains per hour in both directions between London Marylebone and High Wycombe, and one per hour between London Marylebone and Aylesbury via Amersham.

CrossCountry  No direct services will run between Birmingham and Bristol, Cambridge, Cardiff, Nottingham, Peterborough and Stansted Airport. A very limited service is planned from Birmingham to Manchester and Southampton, and from Derby to Edinburgh via Leeds, York and Newcastle.

East Midlands Railway  Just one train per hour will run in each direction between London St Pancras and each of Nottingham and Sheffield; and between Derby and both Matlock and Nottingham. All other routes will be closed.

Gatwick Express  Services will be suspended. Passengers travelling to or from Gatwick Airport can use Southern and Thameslink trains.

Trains are stored at a sidings in Ely, Cambridgeshire, as rail services have been severely disrupted

A member of staff on a empty platform platform at Waterloo Station in London today 

A view of Winchester railway station in Hampshire, which has also been affected by the strikes 

Passengers waiting on the platform at a quiet Wimbledon station , south west London

Some buses will suspend their services on Friday and Saturday as part of a 48-hour walkout

Grand Central  Just three trains in each direction will run between London King’s Cross and both Northallerton and Wakefield Kirkgate.

Great Northern  There will be very few trains, with no services east of Ely to King’s Lynn.

Great Western Railway  No services will run on many routes, such as all those in Cornwall, branch lines in Devon, between Cardiff and Swansea, and between Bath and Portsmouth.

Greater Anglia  On strike days, the company will not run any trains on its regional and branch lines. A very limited service will operate on some routes to and from London Liverpool Street.

Heathrow Express  A full service will operate, but only between 7.30am and 6.10pm.

Hull Trains  Trains will only run between Doncaster and London King’s Cross, with five in each direction.

London North Eastern Railway  Only one train per hour will operate between Edinburgh and London King’s Cross, and two per hour doing part of the route.

London Northwestern Railway  A limited service will run to and from Birmingham New Street and both Crewe and London Euston. Other routes will be closed.

Lumo  A reduced timetable will be in place between London King’s Cross and Edinburgh.

It was very quiet at the Windsor and Eton Riverside Station as many people decided to work from home to avoid the ongoing chaos

Rail services are set to be severely disrupted by tomorrow’s mass walkout on the London Underground and Overground 

Merseyrail  A limited service will operate. No trains will run between Chester and Rock Ferry or Ellesmere Port and Rock Ferry.

Northern  Passengers are urged ‘not to travel’ as only a small number of routes will have trains. Routes that will be open include Liverpool to Manchester; Manchester to Alderley Edge; York to Leeds; and Leeds to Sheffield.

ScotRail  Trains will only run across the Central Belt, Fife and the Borders.

South Western Railway  A ‘severely limited service’ will run, and only between London Waterloo and Basingstoke, Southampton, Windsor and Woking.

Southeastern  Only 44 out of 180 stations will be open, with the vast majority of the network in Kent and East Sussex closed. The high-speed route to Ashford International will be open.

Southern  Much of the network will be shut down. Services will run on the Brighton Mainline to London Bridge and London Victoria, with additional trains from Tattenham Corner, Epsom Downs, Sutton and West Croydon via Crystal Palace.

Thameslink  There will be far fewer trains than normal. Services will be split north and south, with nothing running between London St Pancras and London Bridge.

TransPennine Express  There will only be a very limited service, with just these routes open: Manchester Airport to Preston; Manchester Piccadilly to York; Newcastle to Edinburgh; and Cleethorpes to Sheffield.

Transport for Wales  Most lines will be closed. An hourly service will run between Cardiff and Newport, with limited trains elsewhere.

West Midlands Railway  A limited service will operate only between Lichfield Trent Valley and Redditch/Bromsgrove via Birmingham New Street; Crewe and Birmingham New Street via Wolverhampton; and Birmingham New Street and London Euston via Northampton.

When are RMT workers striking? 

RMT Union members are have walked out today and plan to do the same again on Saturday. 

The Union says mass walk outs are due to ‘an ongoing dispute over pensions and jobs’. 

Adam Keam holds up a flag as members of the RMT stand on a picket line outside Manchester Piccadilly train station

Members of the RMT stand on a picket line outside Manchester Victoria train station

Members gathered at a picket line in Manchester as part of a mass walk out impacting the whole country

‘LUL [London Underground Limited] and TfL management have consistently refused to engage in discussions around safeguarding jobs, pensions and conditions on the spurious grounds that they are unable to give any assurances to our members until they have a financial settlement with the government’, it said in a statement. 

RMT general secretary Mick Lynch added: ‘Our members will once again take to picket lines in this important dispute over pensions, jobs and conditions.

‘They have been messed around by TfL and Mayor Sadiq Khan. And to add insult to injury they have not seen the detail of this funding letter from government.

‘Unless there can be assurances made about jobs, pensions and detrimental changes to working conditions, then our strike on 19 August will go ahead.’

How much do train drivers get paid on average? 

On average, train drivers earn £60,000 – double that of teachers, nurses and police.

Rail industry sources have previously told MailOnline that train drivers now earn an average of £60,000, based on the 2021/2022 year – a 35 per cent rise over the last ten years.

This is a weighted average of basic pay that has emerged in a salary review paper by the Rail Delivery Group, which surveyed rail operating companies across Britain.

The industry sources added that a small percentage of drivers can even earn over £100,000 if they complete large amounts of overtime, although they tend to be the drivers who do the most to maintain the network’s resilience during disruption.

Train drivers are very well paid when compared to public sector roles – with care workers earning an average of £19,250, according to National Careers Service data.

The NCS also gives averages of £21,000 for refuse collectors, £25,250 for librarians, £28,594 for nurses, £28,218 for firefighters and £30,147 for police officers. Social workers earn an average of £32,000, paramedics £32,341 and teachers £33,659.

The NCS also says that train station workers earn an average of £22,250, track maintenance workers £25,250, train conductors £29,500 and railway signallers £43,000 – but it puts train drivers on a much lower average of £44,500.

Network Rail puts these averages slightly higher at £31,000 for maintenance workers and £44,000 for signallers. The RMT says its average rail members earn £33,000, while Network Rail says the overall average for all rail workers is £36,000.

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