Nearly a third of millennials identify as LGBTQ, new study finds

Nearly a third of millennials identify as LGBTQ, new study finds

Nearly a third of millennials identify as LGBTQ, new study finds

  • The study by Arizona Christian University surveyed 600 millennials – ages 18 to 37 – in an effort to provide insight into the generation  
  • The research defines millennials as people born from 1984 to 2003 compared with most studies that define them as born between 1977 to 1995
  • Thirty-nine percent of the 30 percent millennials who identified as LGBTQ were between the ages of 18 and  24
  • George Barna, who oversaw the study, invited the public to look upon the group to help them navigate ‘through the challenges in which they’ve been immersed’
  • ‘Rather than blasting them for a range of perceived inadequacies, perhaps we can support them with perspective, solutions, resources, and encouragement’
  • Other findings suggest millennials are mostly anti-establishment, unpatriotic, pro-freedom of religion, and desperately trying to find a purpose in life

Nearly a third of millennials in the US identify as LGBTQ, a new study by Arizona Christian University found.

The study, conducted in August and published last month, surveyed 600 millennials – ages 18 to 37 – in an effort to provide insight into the generation. 

The research defines millennials as people born from 1984 to 2003, compared with most studies that define them as born between 1977 and 1995. 

According to the study: ‘[Millenials are] redefining sexuality, their own and how to perceive and respond to the gender identity and sexual-orientation choices of others.’ 

Thirty-nine percent of the 30 percent millennials who identified as LGBTQ were between the ages of 18 and 24.

George Barna, the university’s Cultural Research Center’s director of research and the person who oversaw the study, invited the public to look upon the group to help them navigate ‘through the challenges in which we have immersed them.’

‘Rather than blasting them for a range of perceived inadequacies, perhaps we can support them with perspective, solutions, resources, and encouragement,’ Barna said.

Other findings suggest that American millennials are also mostly anti-establishment, unpatriotic, pro-freedom of religion, and desperately trying to find a purpose in life.

Thirty-nine percent of the 30 percent millennials who identified as LGBTQ were between the ages of 18 to 24

Thirty percent of millennials self-identify as LGBTQ, a study found

George Barna, the university’s Cultural Research Center’s director of research and the person who oversaw the study, invited the public to look upon the group to help them navigate ‘through the challenges in which we have immersed them.’  Above, Arizona Christian University

‘Rather than blasting them for a range of perceived inadequacies, perhaps we can support them with perspective, solutions, resources, and encouragement,’ Arizona Christian University Cultural Research Director George Barna said

Millennials in the study voted the management of the COVID-19 pandemic as the most important issue the country is facing and disregarded rule of law, national defense, and national values and morals as the least compelling – with only two percent voting in their favor.

Research results convey a reverberation of the political turmoil the generation of young adults has instilled in the country.

The study unveiled that close to half of the young adults prefer socialism to capitalism. Forty percent self-identified as liberal or progressive compared to just 29 percent who claimed to be conservative.

The generation is more likely to be liberal than conservative regarding fiscal matters, social issues, and governance, the study found.

One out of every three young adults – 33 percent – said they had personally participated in a protest march, rally, or demonstration during the prior month.

Volunteering their time to help people and donating money to organizations other than a church or religious center were voted as the go-to ways millennials engage with their community.

Those surveyed voted the state of the nation as the area they were least satisfied with – only 15 percent said they were pleased with the current state of affairs in the US.

But beyond the progressive ideals, the generation – overwhelmed by a public mental health crisis as suicide rates among the group spike at an alarming rate – is aching to find a purpose in life.

They admitted to feeling stressed, depressed or anxious, and lost. Three in four millennials said they were still trying to find their purpose in life, and seven in ten said they would sacrifice their life for something, most likely ‘to save, protect, or defend’ family members and their freedom. 

The things they were least likely to sacrifice their life for were the country and their most cherished possessions.

For the most part, the generation rejected the idea of an ultimate and absolute moral truth but held favorable views about the bible and Jesus. 

Millennials were more likely to have a negative than positive view of atheism, the study found, despite forty of the young adults surveyed not believing, knowing, or caring if God exists.

The study surveyed ‘millennials’ between the ages of 18 and 37, even though most sources only regard those 25-40 (in 2021) as part of the generational group.

A Gallup poll in February found that 1 in 6 members of Generation Z, which millennials fall under, were part of the LGBTQ community.

 

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