Mum, 29, receives shock breast cancer diagnosis after getting a boob job but vows to fight disease for her three kids

Mum, 29, receives shock breast cancer diagnosis after getting a boob job but vows to fight disease for her three kids

A MUM-of-three discovered she had an aggressive form of breast cancer just months after getting a boob job.

Amy Carroll, 29, found a lump in her breast in January, following her operation the previous October.

She assumed the lump was a side effect following her surgery – but was told otherwise by doctors.

Now, brave Amy is fighting the deadly disease, raising her three boys and running a new business.

The mum and model, who runs the Diamond Glow tanning salon in Derby city centre, said: “Basically if I hadn’t had my boobs done, I wouldn’t have known that the cancer was there.

“I had my boobs done in October and I thought it might be a bit of gristle because of that.

“I went for a check up for my boobs and they said it was nothing to do with the enhancement, and they told me to go to the doctor."

Her initial diagnosis may have been slowed by as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, she believes.

“I’m only 29 and you know when you just put these things off for a while and it took a while to get into the doctors anyway and be seen because of Covid, so it took time to get into the breast unit," she said.


Since her diagnosis, Amy has begun her chemotherapy treatment against the invasive cancer.

Invasive forms of cancer are cancer cells that have broken out of their point of origin and spread to other parts of the body.

Amy’s cancer has since spread from her breast to her lymph glands, with five tumours on her right side.

And the mum says it has been hard keeping all the different aspects of her life afloat.

'THEY'VE ONLY GOT ME'

“I’m just trying to keep everything up and going as much as I can with three kids, but it’s so hard at the minute," she said.

“I am just getting on with it to be honest, before I get too poorly.

“Because obviously this is my shop, everything is all in a mess at the minute, because of Covid we couldn’t open the shop and then having three kids, trying to make sure they’re alright.

“It’s just bad timing because it’s my 30th this year as well, so this was supposed to be my year to get on my feet.”

Obviously, it’s going through your head what would happen if anything happens to me, where do the kids go, because I don’t have a clue.

She also explained how, once she started her chemotherapy treatment, she started to lose her hair and decided to take action.

She let her three sons, Jesse, three, Ronnie, seven, and Jack, 13, cut her hair off, which she said was an emotional experience.

“They’ve only got me,” she said.

“Obviously, it’s going through your head what would happen if anything happens to me, where do the kids go, because I don’t have a clue.

“I’m not really trying to think of it like that, I’m trying to look at the worst case scenario and build up from that really."

Without financial support, Amy fears her business may have to close once she becomes too ill to run it.

She is now fundraising in an attempt to support her family while she undergoes treatment.

You can find Amy’s fundraiser here.

How to check for breast cancer

There is a five-step self exam you can do at home to check for any changes in your breasts.

  • Step one: Begin by looking in a mirror, facing it with your arms on your hips and your shoulders straight. You should be looking for any dimpling, puckering, bulging skin, redness, soreness, a rash or changes in the nipple.
  • Step two: Still looking in the mirror, raise both arms above your head and check for the same changes.
  • Step three: With your arms still above your head, check for any fluid coming from the nipples. This can include milky, yellow or watery fluid, or blood.
  • Step four: While lying down use your opposite hand to check each breast. Using a few fingers, keeping them flat and together, go in a small circular motion around your breasts. Make sure you feel the entire breast by going top to bottom in these small circles. It helps to develop a system or pattern to make sure every inch is covered. Use light pressure for the skin and tissue just beneath, medium pressure for the tissue in the middle of your breasts, and firm pressure to feel the tissue at the back, feeling down to your ribcage.
  • Step five: Feel your breasts while either standing or sitting, using the same small circular motions.

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