Merriam-Webster adds 455 new words to dictionary, including 'dad bod'

Merriam-Webster adds 455 new words to dictionary, including 'dad bod'

Fluffernutter and dad bod are officially new words: Merriam-Webster adds 455 new words to the dictionary – including the one that describes the white sandwich bread with peanut butter and marshmallow creme

  • The dictionary is going into 2022 with 455 new words, which were recently added by Merriam-Webster, including ‘dad bod,’ ‘fluffernutter,’ and ‘amirite’
  • A handful of new additions emerged after the COVID-19 pandemic began in 2020, with the word ‘pandemic’ being the English word of the year last year 
  • Some of the new words added: ‘digital nomad,’ ‘super-spreader,’ ‘vaccine passport,’ ‘deplatform,’ ‘TBH (to be honest),’ and ‘amirite (am I right?)’  
  • The new dictionary additions are grouped into categories for food, medicine, politics, the coronavirus, online culture, pop culture, and tech and science 
  • The word ‘fluffernutter,’ a sandwich made with peanut butter and marshmallow crème, was added along with ‘dad bod,’ a physique typical of an average father
  • While some words like COVID-19 get a fast-pass into dictionary coinage, other words can take years and even decades to make it into the dictionary’s lexicon 

The English language dictionary is going into 2022 with 455 new words, which were recently added by Merriam-Webster, including the likes of ‘dad bod,’ ‘fluffernutter,’ ‘amirite’ and ‘TBH.’

A handful of the new additions emerged after the COVID-19 pandemic began last year, with the word ‘pandemic’ itself being the English word of the year in 2020.

Meanwhile, the phrase ‘COVID-19’ made it into the dictionary in record time – just 34 days after the emergence of the coronavirus in mid-March 2020.

Some of the other new words added to the dictionary this year unclude: ‘digital nomad,’ ‘super-spreader,’ ‘vaccine passport,’ ‘deplatform,’ ‘FTW (for the win),’ ‘TBH (to be honest),’ ‘amirite (am I right?),’ ‘breakthrough,’ ‘long Covid,’ and ‘copypasta’.

The new dictionary additions are grouped into categories for food, medicine, politics, the coronavirus, online culture, pop culture, and tech and science.  

Pictured: ‘fluffernutter,’ a sandwich made with peanut butter and marshmallow crème, has now been added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary this year

‘Dad bod,’ pictured, which is a physique regarded as typical of an average father, especially one that is slightly overweight and not extremely muscular, was also added to the dictionary

For new food words, Merriam-Webster has added the likes of ‘horchata,’ which is a cold sweetened beverage, ‘chincharron,’ which is a small piece of pork belly eaten as a snack, ‘goetta,’ which is a kind of meat patty, ‘fluffernutter,’ a sandwich made with peanut butter and marshmallow crème, and ‘air fryer.’ 

In the world of medicine, new words added to the dictionary include ‘fourth trimester,’ which is generally described as the first three-months of a newborn’s life, ‘halotherapy,’ a treatment for asthma, bronchitis, and allergies, and ‘titer,’ a kind of blood sample measurement. 

For pop culture, Merriam-Webster is introducing the words ‘otaku,’ which is a person having an intense or obsessive interest in the fields of anime and manga, ‘faux-hawk,’ a hairstyle resembling a Mohawk, and ‘dad bod,’ which is a physique regarded as typical of an average father, especially one that is slightly overweight and not extremely muscular. 

The language of politics has expended in this year’s dictionary as well, with new words being added including ‘vote-a-rama,’ an unusually large number of debates and votes that happen in one day on a single piece of legislation. 

Then there is ‘whataboutism,’ the act or practice of responding to an accusation of wrongdoing by claiming that an offense committed by another is similar or worse, and ‘astroturf,’ or something falsely made to appear grassroots.

This year’s new additions unsurprisingly include a number of tech and science words, such as the likes of ‘bit rot,’ which is the tendency for digital information to degrade or become unusable over time, ‘teraflop,’ a unit of measure for the calculating speed of a computer equal to one trillion, and ‘copypasta,’ which is data that has been copied and spread widely online.

While some words like COVID-19 get a fast-pass into dictionary coinage, other words can take years and even decades to make it into the dictionary’s lexicon.

‘COVID-19 was a term that had never been heard by anybody just 35 days before was entered into the dictionary. And that is an all-time speed record,’ Peter Sokolowski, editor-at-large at Merriam-Webster, told Parade.com.

‘People say, ‘How long does it take for a word to get into the dictionary?’ Could be six or 10 or 60 years, it depends, but it was always measured in years until now.’

Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged, together with its 1993 Addenda Section, includes some 470,000 entries, with the Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition, reporting a similar number, according to Merriam-Webster’s website.

The full list of new words has not been immediately released as of Thursday. 

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