Incredible photos offer behind-the-scenes insight into the lives of British Army troops – The Sun

Incredible photos offer behind-the-scenes insight into the lives of British Army troops – The Sun

THESE stunning images capture the day-to-day lives of the British Army troops stationed around the world.

The incredible photos submitted to the annual Army Photographic Competition give insight into what Britain's soldiers get up to at work and in their down time.



In Denmark, a rifleman looks through the scope of his weapon while hiding among the bush during a training exercise.

Another image shows camouflaged-painted soldiers hunching down in the foliage during an exercise in Australia.

British soldiers were also snapped braving the harsh conditions in the Arctic Circle next to their Apache helicopter.

A few submissions include portraits of steely-eyed soldiers covered in camouflage face paint and with a projection of binary numbers over them.

It's not all work and no play, as one of the images submitted shows the fierce Inter Service Rugby League Championships that were held at the Army Rugby Stadium in Aldershot.

Another image shows an Army captain in the driver seat of the race car he built himself as part of the British Army Motorsport.

This year's competition is still open for submission and is open to professional Army photographers, as well as regular and reserve personnel, cadet staff and civilians.














Command Master Photographer WO1 Daniel Harmer, RLC, said: “The Army Film and Photographic Competition is the British Army’s annual event that identifies the best imagery and videos captured across the Army’s areas of operations.

“This is an opportunity for the professional Army photographic trade, wider Army and civilian participation to engage and capture what life is like in the British Army, whilst highlighting the wide variety of job roles and locations that the Army currently operate in.

“This competition always provides an exceptional array of photography and videography, highlighting the range of skills and ability by both serving professional and amateur photographers and those within the wider civilian community.”

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