Headteacher branded ‘Britain’s biggest snowflake’ for banning kids from playing TAG at break time – The Sun

Headteacher branded ‘Britain’s biggest snowflake’ for banning kids from playing TAG at break time – The Sun

A HEADTEACHER has been branded Britain's biggest snowflake after banning kids from playing tag at break time.

Students at Rudyard Kipling Primary School are instead told to play with "gentle hands".

In a letter to parents, headteacher Joanne Smith said children were allowed to hold hands or play clapping games.

She said: "Gentle Hands simply means playing games outside that do not need to be physical.

"This will ensure the playground is a happy, safe and calm place where everyone can enjoy their lunchtime running around and getting the exercise we know is important to them."

But parents of children at the school, in Brighton, East Sussex, slammed the bizarre rule – saying their kids were now bored at playtime.

The mum of one ten-year-old student said: "The school have got it completely backwards.

"Sometimes, I don't even know what planet Brighton is on.

"They're banning children from playing tag? Why on earth would anyone thing tag is a bad thing?

"I'm going to teach my son about another game instead, that'll really scare the snowflake headteacher – kiss-chase."

Other parents sounded off on social media – pointing out children needed physical activity and stimulation during break.

One wrote: "Class rooms are calm places.

"Playgrounds are where children go to run off steam to ensure that classrooms stay calm places.

"A playground is anything but calm and shouldn't be."

'KILLJOY'

Another said: "Rudyard Kipling would be turning in his grave knowing that Britain's biggest snowflake is running his school.

"Can't play conkers, can't play tag – no wonder children are turning to crime – there's nothing else for them to do."

A third described the policy as a "killjoy".

The school, that describes itself as 'fully inclusive', has around 415 pupils and was rated as 'Good' at the last Ofsted inspection.

A spokesperson for the school confirmed they were supporting "gentle hands", saying: "We want to make sure the playground is a happy, safe and calm place where everyone can enjoy their lunchtime running around and getting the exercise we know is important to them.

"With the full support of our staff and our Parents Teachers and Friends Association, we have reminded the children of our 'Gentle Hands' rule during break and lunchtimes.

"This is because last half term we had a few incidents involving rough play and play fighting that were causing children to get upset. "Gentle Hands' simply means playing games outside that do not need to be overly physical and risk hurting or upsetting other children."

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