Graphic horror film that caused viewers to faint is coming to the UK

Graphic horror film that caused viewers to faint is coming to the UK

Filmgoers FAINT at Australian premiere of ultra-violent French horror film Titane, featuring a woman who has sex with a car (and it’s coming soon to a UK cinema screen near you)

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT
  • Dozens of audience members from down under walked out at the thriller’s premiere at Sydney Film Festival
  • Titane tells the story of a murderous woman who is impregnated by a Cadillac and kills people without a care  
  • British audiences will be able to test their mettle when the horror film comes to the UK on December 31

An ultra-violent horror film about a young woman who has sex with cars and gets impregnated by a vintage Cadillac which caused Australian audiences to faint in shock is coming to the UK. 

Dozens of audience members down under walked out and fell ill at the gory thriller’s premiere at the Sydney Film Festival on Thursday.   

Titane, by French director Julia Ducournau, tells the story of a young woman who kills without a care and pretends to be a boy despite being pregnant by the vintage car.

According to viewers attending a screening at the Sydney Film Festival, scores left the cinema while as many as 20 fainted.

And British audiences will be able to test their mettle when the horror film comes to UK cinemas on December 31 this year. 

Dozens of Australian viewers walked out and fell ill at the Titane’s premiere at the Sydney Film Festival on Thursday 

Some extremely violent scenes had cinema-goers shielding their eyes at the film’s early festival screenings, as sharp intakes of breath alternated with nervous giggles. 

The movie still won a long standing ovation at its opening night of Cannes film festival in France though. 

Fixated on vehicles, the murderous heroine has sex with a car, becomes pregnant and gives birth to the resulting monster. 

The film might have won Palme d’Or, the highest prize awarded at the Cannes Film Festival, but it has turned the stomachs of many who watch it. 

Titane, by French director Julia Ducournau, tells the story of a young woman who kills without a care and pretends to be a boy despite being pregnant by the vintage car 

’15 people walked out of Titane at #SydFilmFest tonight. Missed a great, but strange, movie!’ one person tweeted. 

Another wrote: ‘A friend fainted during TITANE last night and told me that 20 other people did as well – now that’s cinema baby!’ 

Someone else reported: ‘Multiple walkouts during Titane, they definitely did not prepare for that lol.’

According to audience members attending a screening at the Sydney Film Festival, scores left the cinema, unable to cope with what they were seeing, while as many as 20 fainted

One more said: ’13 people fainted at the Sydney premiere of Titane.’ 

Acknowledging that some scenes were difficult to watch, Ducournau told reporters that even the goriest bits had narrative meaning. ‘I hate gratuitous violence, I really do,’ she said.

The film drew some flattering comparisons with ‘Crash’ by David Cronenberg – another controversial look at driving and eroticism – and ‘Blue Velvet’ by David Lynch, both of which became instant classics after premiering in Cannes.

The Hollywood Reporter said the movie, which is competing for the Palme d’Or, might herald a ‘French-Punk-Queer Wave’, while IndieWire said it was ‘one of the wildest films ever to screen at Cannes’.

The flick might have won Palme d’Or – the highest prize awarded at the Cannes Film Festival – but it has turned the stomachs of many who watch it

But others were not as receptive to it. The Guardian called it a ‘car crash’ because of its ‘sheer silliness and towering pointlessness’, French paper Liberation said the storyline was ‘pretty much inarticulate’ and Switzerland’s Le Temps wondered what the film-maker had meant by her ‘pretentious’ offering. 

While some felt let down by the French director – whose cannibalistic debut ‘Raw’ delighted critics a few years ago – others gave her full marks.

‘Ducournau breaks all the rules, to our greatest pleasure,’ gushed French magazine Les Inrockuptibles. ‘Her furious film is like no other.’

British audiences will be able to test their mettle when the horror film comes to UK cinemas on December 31 this year 

The director herself said she felt ‘a lot of anger’ while writing the film.

‘Trump had just been elected, and the world was not a happy place,’ she told AFP in an interview.

‘I was very pessimistic about the future and about a society that has no room for fluidity, transformation, for change and inclusiveness,’ she said, adding: ‘There was also a desire for metal and skin that I can’t really explain.’ 

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