English Civil War history buffs re-enact the march down The Mall

English Civil War history buffs re-enact the march down The Mall

English Civil War history buffs re-enact King Charles I’s march along The Mall to the scaffold to be executed 370 years ago

  • History enthusiasts led a procession from St James Palace on the Mall to the Banqueting House in Whitehall 
  • The annual march is held to commemorate the historic execution of Charles I’ from more than 370 years ago 
  •  Charles I, who became the nation’s king at the tender age of 24, was put on trial for treason by MPs, including the Parliamentarian general Oliver Cromwell, in 1649
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The streets of central London were filled with a troupe of 17th Century Civil War re-enactors yesterday as they marched down The Mall in honour of Charles I. 

Hundreds of history enthusiasts, dressed in armour and uniforms from the period, led a procession from St James Palace on the Mall to the Banqueting House in Whitehall to commemorate the historic event 370 years ago.

The King’s Army Annual March follows the route the English king took before he was executed in 1649 and has become a key event etched in the diary of the society since 1951.

Charles I, who became the nation’s king at the tender age of 24 following the death of his brother Henry, was put on trial for treason by MPs, including the Parliamentarian general Oliver Cromwell, after they claimed he had committed ‘wicked’ abuses of power’.  

The society aim to re-create the atmospheric moment before his untimely death and retain the historical authenticity of the turbulent 17th century.


History enthusiasts marched down The Mall in London in honour of the final steps taken by King Charles I on January 30 in 1969


The 17th century Civil War re-enactors walked down the streets of London dressed in armour and uniforms from the period to  commemorate the historic event more than 300 years ago


Members from the English Civil War society led a procession from St James Palace on the Mall to the Banqueting House in Whitehall 


The event, which has become an annual event for the society since 1951, sees history buffs dressed in authentic costumes and carrying replica artifacts from the 17th century


Some members from the society took to the streets on horseback as they re-traced the route taken by King Charles I in 1649


Re-enactors from the English Civil War Society held replica weapons in their hands as they took part in the King’s Annual Parade in London


After taking part in the annual march, some marchers took to the pub for a well-deserved break and some warmth

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Women dressed and children were also spotted wearing traditional 17th century attire as they took part in the annual march


The English Civil War Society aim to re-create seventeenth century military and civil life and keep alive the history from more than 300 years ago


The King’s Army Annual March sees history buffs match from St James Palace on the Mall to the place of his death at the Banqueting House in Whitehall, London


A few members of the society, dressed in traditional clothing from the period, were seen taking a seat against a wall during the march on January 27


One member of the group stood with a reef in honour of the historic event. The words on the reef read: ‘We remember The King’s Army of the English Civil War Society’


A group of men dressed in traditional 17th century attire gather around to celebrate the former monarch’s life, which ended when he was executed in 1649 


A young girl tries to stay warm as a group of women stand around her during the annual march held by the English Civil War Society


A member of the English War Society stands guard with a helmet and a replica weapon during the event honouring the late king

Why was King Charles I executed?

King Charles I was born in Fife, Scotland, in 1600 and became king in 1925 following the death of his older brother Henry.

The new monarch favoured a High Anglican form of worship and his wife, Henrietta Maria of France, was Catholic.  

He went on to dissolve parliament three times from 1625 to 1629 and he decided to rule alone.

This meant the king was left to try and raise funds by non-parliamentary means, which made him unpopular with the British public. He also tried to force a new prayer book on the country.


King Charles I (with his wife Queen Henrietta Maria) was born in Fife, Scotland, and became king when he was 24 years old 

The king then tried to have five MPs arrested and was involved in other disagreements following tense discussions over who should command an army to defeat the uprising in Ireland and a civil war broke out.   

In 1646 the Royalists were defeated and Charles subsequently surrendered to the Scots and he later escaped to the Isle of Wight a year later.

Charles was put on trial for treason by a number of MPs, including Parliamentarian general Oliver Cromwell.

He was convicted and later executed outside the Banqueting House on Whitehall in London.   

 

 

 

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