DAILY MAIL COMMENT: Let's not tax hard work and aspiration

DAILY MAIL COMMENT: Let's not tax hard work and aspiration

DAILY MAIL COMMENT: Let’s not tax hard work and aspiration

After 12 years of Conservative rule, it beggars belief that Britain is labouring under the highest taxes since the 1950s.

You’d imagine a new Tory chancellor’s immediate reaction would be to ease the crippling burden. But if reports are to be believed, Jeremy Hunt is instead thinking of piling even more weight on the shoulders of hard-pressed families – and in the middle of a cost of living crunch too.

Ministers have strongly hinted that the state pension and benefits will be protected in next week’s Budget.

As a result, middle-class workers face the grim prospect of higher taxes to fill a £60billion black hole in the Treasury’s coffers. Incredibly, Mr Hunt is considering raising the top rate of tax for those earning over £150,000 from 45p to 50p.

DAILY MAIL COMMENT: After 12 years of Conservative rule, it beggars belief that Britain is labouring under the highest taxes since the 1950s. Chancellor of the Exchequer Jeremy Hunt is pictured on November 1

This would be a depressing return to the stale class war policies of Gordon Brown. It would be a tax on enterprise, initiative and hard work – the very foundations of Conservatism and crucial building blocks of a strong economy. If the rich then leave, they’ll pay no tax, forcing the less wealthy to foot the bill. Mr Hunt must think twice.

With the Tories also considering another stealth raid on pensions, hikes in capital gains and dividend taxes, and a fresh grab at inheritance tax, this looks like all-out war on aspirational Middle England.

Yes, Mr Hunt is right to want to start balancing the books. But doing so off the back of wealth creators and savers is madness. These people have always been the backbone of the economy – and we will need them to revive our fortunes.

We might expect such economically ruinous policies from Labour. If Mr Hunt brings them in, it will beg the dismal question: Is there really any point in voting for the Tory party after November 17?

Mr Hunt is right to want to start balancing the books. But doing so off the back of wealth creators and savers is madness (Pictured with Prime Minister Rishi Sunak on October 31)

No need to say sorry

Nicola Sturgeon never misses a chance to highlight the alleged moral failings of England. And if, simultaneously, she can signal her own virtue… well, all the better.

To that end, the posturing SNP leader has offered £7million in ‘reparations’ to developing nations for the climate damage caused by historical carbon emissions.

What voters, who face hardship from spiralling bills, make of this largesse we can only wonder. And, of course, without the Barnett formula, guaranteeing Scotland a generous share of UK spending, she’d have much less cash to splurge.

Why, anyway, should Britain apologise? The technologies arising from our Industrial Revolution have lifted entire nations out of abject poverty. Perhaps we should be thanked, rather than asked to pay the bill!

Nicola Sturgeon (pictured on November 8) never misses a chance to highlight the alleged moral failings of England

Pensions secretary Mel Stride fatuously thinks the eco-rabble paralysing the M25 in protest at Britain’s fossil fuel use have a point ‘in a sense’.

No, minister, they do not. Just Stop Oil are contemptuously sticking two fingers up at the law – and their fellow citizens.

Cultishly obsessed with ‘saving the planet’, these middle-class agitators are callously indifferent to those they disrupt, from cancer patients missing appointments to nurses stuck in traffic.

We were told the court injunction would end this farce. That it hasn’t shows just how toothless our leaders are. 

Just Stop Oil are contemptuously sticking two fingers up at the law – and their fellow citizens. Pictured: Traffic building up after activists from Just Stop Oil occupied a gantry over the M25

Britain is in the grip of a drug-driving epidemic, with a troubling surge in motorists found to be high at the wheel by police. 

A shocking 77 drivers a day are prosecuted for being under the influence of illegal narcotics such as cocaine – trebling in just five years. 

With their lethal disregard for other road users, these idiots pose as big a danger as drink drivers. 

If the threat of six months in prison is no deterrent, ministers must toughen up the penalty.

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