A member of diplomatic staff kicked out of the UK over rape claim

A member of diplomatic staff kicked out of the UK over rape claim

A member of diplomatic staff was kicked out of the UK after he was accused of rape and attempted rape, Foreign Office reveals

  • Foreign Office has revealed the offences diplomatic staff were accused of  
  • Includes a man accused of rape, attempted rape and malicious communication
  • Others accused of possessing guns, blackmail and driving with no insurance

A member of diplomatic staff was kicked out of Britain after he was accused of rape and attempted rape, it was today revealed. 

While other embassy staff based in the UK have been accused of blackmail, carrying a gun with intent to injure, and drink driving.

The litany of offences have been revealed in an official Foreign Office statement which details offences alleged to have been carried out by staff entitled to diplomatic immunity.

It means those accused of the criminal offences can escape justice by claiming diplomatic immunity – although Britain can expel them. 

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said that in 2017 there were 12 ‘serious and significant offences allegedly committed by people entitled to diplomatic or international organisation-related immunity in the United Kingdom’.

The litany of offences have been revealed in an official Foreign Office statement  by Jeremy Hunt (pictured in Downing Street today) which details offences alleged to have been carried out by staff entitled to diplomatic immunity


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Among them was a man accused of rape, attempted rape and malicious communications.

The Foreign Office refused to identify what country the man was from because the diplomatic misson is so small.

British authorities asked the man’s country if they would agree to waive his diplomatic immunity so he could be prosecuted, but they refused .

What is diplomatic immunity? 

Under the 1961 Vienna Convention diplomats are – in theory – immune from prosecution in their host country.

In the UK, this means that diplomatic staff and their families who are accused of crimes can claim immunity to evade justice. 

Britain will often ask the country to waive the person’s immunity if they are accused of a crime so they can be prosecuted in the UK courts.

But if the country refuses the request, they cannot be prosecuted and can only be expelled from the UK. 

The Foreign Office also produces an annual run-down of diplomatic staff accused of serious offences. 

Instead the man was kicked out of the country. 

The figures also revealed that people from Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone and Finland were accused of driving without insurance.

Someone from Cambodia was accused of having a firearm with intent to injure, another person from Egypt was accused of blackmail, and an Algerian was accused of sexual assault. 

The Foreign Office also revealed that a former diplomat from Cameroon and two members of staff from the country’s High Commission was accused of conspiracy to cheat the public revenue and of conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime between 31 December 2009 and 1 January 2013.

The alleged offences were only now made public because the cases were under investigation. 

Diplomats and their families based in the UK are entitled to diplomatic immunity.

However, Britain will often ask the country to waive the person’s immunity if they are accused of a crime so they can be prosecuted in the UK courts.

But if the country refuses the request, they cannot be prosecuted and can only be expelled from the UK. 

Diplomatic immunity  means those accused of the criminal offences can escape justice by claiming diplomatic immunity – although Britain can expel them (pictured, the scales of justice outside the Old Bailey)

Revealing the cases in a written parliamentary statement, the Foreign Office said: ‘Around 23,000 people are entitled to diplomatic immunity in the UK and the majority of diplomats and dependants abide by UK law. The number of alleged serious crimes committed by members of the diplomatic community in the UK is proportionately low.

‘Under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 1961, we expect those entitled to immunity to obey the law. The FCO does not tolerate foreign diplomats breaking the law.

‘We take all allegations of illegal activity seriously. When the police bring instances of alleged criminal conduct to our attention, we ask the relevant foreign government to waive diplomatic immunity where appropriate.

‘For the most serious offences, and when a relevant waiver has not been granted, we request the immediate withdrawal of the diplomat.’ 

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