Sky Crime’s I Love You, Now Die viewers divided over Michelle Carter case

Sky Crime’s I Love You, Now Die viewers divided over Michelle Carter case

Sky launched its first dedicated True Crime channel last week, as interest in the true crime genre continues to rise, thanks to shows such as Netflix's Making a Murderer and Abducted in Plain Sight.

The first programme released to mark the new channel's launch is HBO's I Love You, Now Die.

I Love You, Now Die examines the highly-publicised Michelle Carter case.

Michelle, now 22, is currently serving a 15-month prison sentence for involuntary manslaughter.

Carter was found guilty of the crime after sending boyfriend Roy Conrad Jr III multiple text messages encouraging him to kill himself.

Conrad Roy, 18, was found dead in his car outside a K-Mart supermarket in Massachusetts, America on July 13 2014.

After police looked at the dead teenager's phone to try and determine why he took his own life, they discovered the shocking messages from Michelle, who was 17 at the time.

Michelle's text messages formed a significant part of the prosecution's evidence – they claimed Carter should be liable for involuntary manslaughter, arguing that her stream of text messages amounted to "wanton or reckless conduct" resulting in an unlawful death.

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Michelle, who entered a not guilty plea at the pre-trial hearing, had only met Conrad in person five times.

However, over the course of their relationship and in the lead-up to Conrad's death, the pair regularly texted.

They specifically bonded over their mental health issues, with Conrad confiding in Michelle that he suffered from social anxiety and depression.

Michelle told him she had body image and self-esteem issues.

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One text she sent him read: "People [from school] tell me they love me and they'd wanna hangout but they never make an effort to. So I always think like 'why am I not good enough'."

The initial messages between the pair show Michelle actively encouraging Conrad to get help for his mental health issues, however, after a while they took a sinister turn.

In the months leading up to Conrad's death, Michelle told Conrad to take his own life on multiple occasion and even went as far as suggesting ways he could do it.

On June 16 2017, Judge Lawrence Moniz of the Bristol County Juvenile Court of Massachusetts in Taunton found Carter guilty of involuntary manslaughter and sentenced her to two-and-a-half years in prison, which she has to serve 15 months of.

Michelle is currently seven months into her 15-month prison sentence, doing her time at the Bristol County House of Correction adult facility.

Speaking after Michelle's sentencing, Conrad's mother Lynn Roy told CBS 48 hours: "I think she needs to be held responsible for her actions ’cause she knew exactly what she was doing. She knew exactly what she was doing and what she said. "I don’t believe she has a conscience."

The case was expected by some to set a legal precedent about whether it's a crime to tell someone to take their own life.

Sky Crime viewers were divided over this and whether Michelle was to blame.

One social networker said: "Having just watched both episodes of I Love You, Now Die on @SkyCrimeUK, this case certainly wasn’t as cut and dried as I first thought and press made out,’ wrote one stunned audience member. A story of love and two f***ed up kids. It’s actually very very sad. #ILoveYouNowDie"

While another continued: "I love you, now die has got me so conflicted."

A third added: "The Michele Carter case is nuts. I was so sure of what I thought about it, but @HBO documentary spills new info that can’t be ignored. The girl needs serious help, but she’s not a killer. And Conrad was a very manipulative person. #iloveyounowdie,’ and I think I’ve changed my mind a bit now #ILoveYouNowDie not so clear cut,’ wrote two more viewers taking a U-turn."

I Love You, Now Die is now available to watch on Sky Crime.

For emotional support you can call the Samaritans 24-hour helpline on 116 123, email jo@samaritans.org, visit a Samaritans branch in person or go to the Samaritans website.

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