How the CU Buffs have fared compared to their fellow Big 12 departures

How the CU Buffs have fared compared to their fellow Big 12 departures

Colorado

2019 athletic department revenue: $94.9 million

Regular-season conference championships since 2011: 12 (all but one from cross country)

Football record from 2011-19: 39-73 (20-61 Pac-12), 1 bowl bid, 14 NFL draft picks

Men’s basketball record since 2011: 186-120 (84-78 Pac 12), 4 NCAA Tournament berths

Bottom line: The majority of CU’s non-revenue sports have enjoyed success in the Pac-12. However, the football team has mostly floundered during the Buffs’ decade in the conference. CU also recorded the lowest amount of annual revenue compared to fellow Big 12 defectors.

Nebraska

2019 athletic department revenue: $136.2 million

Regular-season conference championships since 2011: 12

Football record from 2011-19: 65-50 (40-36 Big Ten), 6 bowl bids, 20 NFL draft picks

Men’s basketball record since 2011: 135-157 (58-108 Big Ten), 1 NCAA Tournament berth

Bottom line: Joining the Big Ten was a financial boon for Nebraska, but its football team languishes in mediocrity. Big Red basketball is even worse. Nebraska continues to rely on an aging tradition to define most of its athletic success.

Missouri

2019 athletic department revenue: $106.6 million

Regular-season conference championships since 2012: 2 (both from women’s volleyball)

Football record from 2011-19: 58-44 (30-34 SEC), 4 bowl bids, 19 NFL draft picks

Men’s basketball record since 2011: 123-137 (50-94 SEC), 2 NCAA Tournament berths

Bottom line: Missouri football won the SEC East twice (2013-14) but hangs in the shadow of traditional powerhouses. The Tigers’ remaining athletic programs haven’t fared much better. Missouri was more competitive in the Big 12.

Texas A&M

2019 athletic department revenue: $212.7 million

Regular-season conference championships since 2012: 16

Football record since 2012-19: 68-36 (34-30 SEC), 8 bowl bids, 30 NFL draft picks

Men’s basketball record since 2012: 153-112 (72-72 SEC), 2 NCAA Tournament berths

Bottom line: A&M is positioned to become an SEC powerhouse as the only Texas school in the conference with arguably the nation’s top recruiting base in its backyard. The Aggies’ athletic revenue has also skyrocketed in the SEC. Despite lacking football championships, A&M is in a much better place than previously with the Big 12.

* Latest financial information courtesy of USA Today’s database. Statistics compiled from sports-reference.com.

Note: Missouri and Texas A&M did not formally join the SEC until 2012.

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