Supermarket queues set to return as Boris orders limit on number of customers in-store

Supermarket queues set to return as Boris orders limit on number of customers in-store

Tesco outline their latest shopping measures ahead of lockdown

Supermarkets have had to adapt their way of operating this year with implementing strict safety rules into stores. With a new strain of the virus proving to spread more quickly, they are being told they must further limit the number of customers in-store at any one time.

The current rules at several supermarkets include a one person per household policy to allow customers in stores to maintain social distancing.

A notice on the Tesco website explains: “We’re asking that only one person from each household comes in-store to do their shopping.

“This is to reduce the number of people in-store at any one time and help maintain social distancing measures.”

Like Tesco, Sainsbury’s is also asking shoppers to shop alone if possible.

READ MORE: Aldi and Lidl share latest lockdown shopping rules

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Their website states: “Where possible, we ask that you only send one adult per household when you shop with us.

“This will help us manage the number of people in our stores and make your shop quicker and smoother.”

While discount retailer Aldi isn’t managing the number of people per household, it is asking shoppers to try to reduce the number of family members at any one time.

Their website explains: “In order to help with social distancing, we are encouraging all customers to try and reduce the number of family members they bring with them into our stores.

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“Where necessary we are using discretion, but like all supermarkets we’re asking people to come alone if possible to support social distancing in our stores.”

While limiting the number of customers in-stores has always been important, social distancing in-store can be tricky.

The number of customers in supermarkets is set to become tighter in fear that supermarkets could become a hotspot for coronavirus.

Ministers are said to have told councils to place further limits on the number of people allowed in shops. 

It comes after scientists blamed a lack of social distancing in supermarkets for the increased spread of the new coronavirus strain which is said to spread more quickly. 

The new rule will see supermarkets carrying out stricter checks and will see possible fines for those breaking the rules. 

To help avoid queues and busy periods, food stores are asking customers to shop during the quieter shopping hours.

At the start of the first lockdown, Aldi released a chart to help shoppers know when they should do their shop.

The discount retailer’s chart shows that the quietest period is in the evening from 7pm onwards until closure. 

While this can differ between stores, picking an evening time slot to shop can help reduce queues outside.

According to Google data, the quietest times to visit a Tesco is typically during the week between Monday and Thursday within the first hour of opening or within the last hour before closure.

Much the same as Tesco, Sainsbury’s quietest time to shop is typically before 10am during the week. 

If customers can’t get to a supermarket, retailers are still offering home delivery, although they are extremely high in demand. 

In other supermarket news, Morrisons recently extended its Click & Collect service to 447 across the country.

The service is also available without an additional delivery charge and is contact-free.

Customers can also pick a time slot that best suits them.

With up to 37,000 slots available every day, the service allows customers to complete an order and then select the collect from a store option.

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