NHS budgets set to be cut by £500MILLION to cover cost of Covid testing

NHS budgets set to be cut by £500MILLION to cover cost of Covid testing

NHS budgets are set to be slashed by £500million to help cover the cost of Covid testing.

Health chiefs say the Treasury has demanded eye-watering savings as the cost of the pandemic bites.

But they warn cost-cutting could mean more Brits get stuck on waiting lists if it slows down hospitals’ recovery.

Julian Kelly, chief financial officer for NHS England, told a board meeting: “We have been asked to see if we can cut core NHS funding – probably to the tune of about £500m.

“That would involve slowing down transformation programmes and re-phasing some of the long-term plan.”

The total NHS budget is around £136billion per year.

Hospital bosses said the latest cut, for the 2022-23 financial year, will eat into funding boosts promised by the government.

They added the health service will suffer a double-whammy with inflation stripping another £1bn out of the purse next year.

Most read in Health

HARD TO SWALLOW

Popular fizzy drinks could increase the risk of deadly cancers, study finds

LET DOWN

Aspiring model, 27, died of cancer after doctor said her hormones were to blame

VIRAL SPREAD

Daily Covid cases up 98k as health chief urges Brits to get spring booster NOW

MOTHER’S LOVE

I'm making the most of the time I have left with my boy after shock diagnosis

NHS Test & Trace has been criticised for its immense £37bn budget but ministers say it was vital to controlling the pandemic.

Saffron Cordery, deputy chief of NHS Providers, said: “The NHS is being left to pick up the Covid bill against a backdrop of rising cases and hospital admissions.

Read More on The Sun

Horrors of Russian ‘butcher of Mariupol’ who bombed ward & ‘gassed Syrians’

Mediterranean-style villa with VINEYARD up for sale – you won’t believe where it is

“A cut as substantial as £500m creates a very real risk of trade-offs, which could affect the ability to increase hospital activity and improve the quality of patient care.”

    Source: Read Full Article