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I'm no dinosaur!

I’m no dinosaur! King Charles wears pink T-Rex tie as he visits Greater Manchester with Queen Consort Camilla

  • King Charles wore a flamboyant T-Rex tie for his outing to Greater Manchester
  • It has been suggested it may have been a Christmas gift from his grandchildren 
  • The ‘R’ initial after King Charles’ name signifies ‘Rex’ – which is Latin for King

King Charles showed off a flash of his personality with a pink T-Rex tie as he visited Greater Manchester with Queen Consort Camilla on Friday afternoon.

The monarch, 74, had a busy day of royal engagements on 20 January as he posed for photographs with England football manager Gareth Southgate at Norbrook Community Centre in Manchester.

Later, he travelled to Bolton Town Hall and marked 100 years of Kelloggs in the UK at Trafford Park in Stretford, Greater Manchester.

Charles was accompanied by his brand new T-Rex tie on the very busy day.

King Charles showed off a flash of his personality with a pink T-Rex tie as he visited Greater Manchester with Queen Consort Camilla on Friday afternoon

The monarch, 74, had a busy day of royal engagements on 20 January as he posed for photographs with England football manager Gareth Southgate at Norbrook Community Centre in Manchester

It could be that the accessory is an inside joke, as Charles uses the initial R after his name to signify ‘Rex’ – which is Latin for ‘King’.

He debuted the pale pink tie at church in Norfolk earlier in January, and rumours have swirled that the accessory could be a Christmas present from his grandchildren.  

It comes after claims emerged that the monarch will break with tradition when he attends his coronation in May by opting for his military uniform instead of standard royal dress.

His Majesty will reportedly not wear silk stockings and breeches as they ‘look too dated’ and he wants the ceremony to reflect a ‘modern 21st century monarchy’.

Later, he travelled to Bolton Town Hall and marked 100 years of Kelloggs in the UK at Trafford Park in Stretford, Greater Manchester

It could be that the accessory is an inside joke, as Charles uses the initial R after his name to signify ‘Rex’ – which is Latin for ‘King’

Charles was said to be ‘happy’ to wear the same garments as his grandfather and great-grandfather, however senior aides said ‘he should not wear them’.

Contrary to previous reports that the occasion is expected to be a smaller affair than the late Queen’s ceremony, it is also understood the spectacle ‘will knock your socks off’.

The monarch is allegedly expected to arrive in the uniform of the Admiral of the Fleet, which he wore during the State Opening of Parliament last year.

‘Though some of the more long-winded elements of the Coronation will be moved aside or modernised, the King was happy to wear the breeches and stockings,’ a source told The Sun.

He debuted the pale pink tie at church in Norfolk earlier in January, and rumours have swirled that the accessory could be a Christmas present from his grandchildren

It comes after claims emerged that the monarch will break with tradition when he attends his coronation in May by opting for his military uniform instead of standard royal dress

‘But in discussion with senior aides they are saying he should not wear them, so will arrive in a military uniform instead.

‘It is largely to do with modernising the Coronation and stripping away the stuffiness.

‘They think having a 74-year-old King arriving in stockings and breeches in 2023 looks too dated. They are probably right.’

He will also wear St Edward’s Crown, which was made in 1661 for the coronation of King Charles II.

It is made of solid gold and features more than 400 gemstones, including six sapphires, and 12 rubies. It weighs nearly 5lbs (2.23kg).

St Edward’s Crown is a replacement for the original that was among the Crown Jewels that were melted down and sold off when the monarchy was abolished in 1649.

A Buckingham Palace statement said in October: ‘The coronation will reflect the monarch’s role today and look towards the future, while being rooted in longstanding traditions and pageantry.’

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