Femail reveals the US food habits that DO NOT translate in Britain

Femail reveals the US food habits that DO NOT translate in Britain

After a transatlantic row over buttering a sandwich, Femail reveals the other American food habits that DO NOT translate in Britain

  • Femail reveals the American foods that are very different in Britain
  • READ MORE: I’m from Chicago but identify as British

A furious transatlantic sandwich row recently broke out online after a British tourist in the US asked for his bread to be buttered and it ended up on the outside of the bread.  

However, buttering sandwiches isn’t the only food habit that doesn’t translate across the pond.

For example if you ask for tea in the States, you’re likes to end up with a cup of sweet, cold ice tea, whereas if you want a cuppa you need to ask for hot tea.

And if you wanted a biscuit with that tea, you would be left disappointed because biscuits in the US are a Southern delicacry similar to a savoury scone, which you pour gravy over.

However, that gravy isn’t the same as our beefy British favourite Bisto, but is more akin to a white sauce with sausage in.

Here Femail reveals the American foods are very different in Britain, even though they sound like the same thing…

TEA 

UK: Here Femail reveals the American foods are very different in Britain but they sound like the same thing, including tea 

US: Americans seem to enjoy iced tea more with 85 percent of the tea consumed in the states over ice, according to Good Life Tea

Although there is a similar love for tea in both countries there’s a very big difference.

Brits tend to enjoy a hot cup of tea as a warm hug throughout the day or even as social activity, such as going for afternoon tea with friends. 

However Americans prefer it cold and sweet – 85 percent of the tea consumed in the States is iced tea according to Good Life Tea.

Also sweet tea is very popular in the Southern states, which is black tea with sugar or syrup and lemon added which is also served cold. 

If you want to request something more akin to the traditional cuppa, you need to ask for hot tea and specify that you want cold milk with it.

To make matters more complicated, if you go to someone’s home they are unlikely to boil the kettle to make your cuppa because they’re not as common in the States, so they will probably have to put a pan of water on the stove to heat instead.  

GRAVY

UK: Many Brits would opt for the Bisto gravy granules adding just hot water for ease

US: In southern American gravy is essentially a roux, which is a mixture of flour and fat cooked together, made of meat drippings, flour, cream, pepper and often crumbled up sausage

This one isn’t too dissimilar because in both countries’ gravy is a sauce made from meat drippings.

Many Brits would opt for the Bisto gravy granules adding just hot water for ease however those that make their own delicious sauce use onions, stock, drippings from meat and corn-starch to thicken.

However, in southern American it is essentially a roux, which is a mixture of flour and fat cooked together, made of meat drippings, flour, cream, pepper and often crumbled up sausage.

The gravy is white in colour and often served over savoury biscuits.

CHIPS 

UK: Chips are a thick slice of potato deep fried, basically a chunkier version of what people in the states call fries

US: If you were to ask for chips in the US, you would be given crispy deep-fried thin sliced potato, or what Brits would call crisps

If you were to ask for chips in the US, you would be given crispy deep-fried thin sliced potato, or what Brits would call crisps.

In the UK, chips are a thick slice of potato deep fried, basically a chunkier version of what people in the states call fries. 

In the US or Canada these more thickly cut chips might be called steak fries, depending on the shape. 

However thinly sliced potatoes in the UK can also be referred to as fries, while thicker slices with spices are called wedges. 

BISCUITS 

UK: Brits would refer to these small flat sweet treats as biscuits however in the US they call these cookies 

US: American biscuits are small, fluffy quick breads, leavened with baking powder or buttermilk and served with gravy

American biscuits are small, fluffy quick breads, leavened with baking powder or buttermilk and served with gravy.

They are close to what the British would call scones, however they are usually savoury.

The main differences are that scones tend to have less butter because you’ll add butter to it when you are eating it, or clotted cream and jam.

While American biscuits tend to have more butter and light layers. They also call what Brits would refer to as a biscuit, cookies.

APPLE CIDER

UK: While in Britain apple cider is a popular alcoholic sparkling beverage, such as Magners 

US: Apple cider in the states and parts of Canada is defined as an unfiltered, unsweetened, nonalcoholic beverage made from pressed apples that still contains some pulp or sediment

The UK and US are the biggest producers of cider in the world, however the words ‘apple cider’ have evolved to mean different things in the two nations. 

Apple cider in the states and parts of Canada is defined as an unfiltered, unsweetened, nonalcoholic beverage made from pressed apples that still contains some pulp or sediment.

It’s also considered a seasonal drink and can be hard to find outside of the autumn months.

While in Britain apple cider is a popular alcoholic sparkling beverage.   

JELLY

UK: Jelly is known as a wobbly gelatin dessert, usually strawberry flavoured, that you eat with ice cream as a child

US: While Americans children eat it too, but they call it ‘Jello’! Jelly is actually jam for them

In the UK, Jelly is known as a wobbly gelatin dessert, usually strawberry flavoured, that you eat with ice cream as a child.

While Americans children eat it too, but they call it ‘Jello’! Jelly is actually jam for them.

So when you hear an American talking about a peanut butter and jelly sandwich they have not put jello in bread!  

SWEET POTATO

UK: Sweet potato is usually enjoyed either mashed or as a side of fries with a savory meal in the UK

US: The most bizzare dish, which is served at Thanksgiving, is the sweet potato casserole which is often topped with gooey mini marshmallows

While both countries equally enjoy delicious sweet potato fries, Americans have also incorporated the root vegetable, also known as yams, into deserts.

The most bizzare dish, which is served at Thanksgiving, is the sweet potato casserole which is often topped with gooey mini marshmallows or candied nuts. 

While sweet potato is usually enjoyed either mashed or as a side of fries with a savoury meal in the UK. 

SMARTIES

UK: Smarties in the UK are chocolates with a hard coloured shell similar to an m&m

US: Believe it or not American Smarties are actually like chalky pastel coloured sweets, similar to our Love Heart sweets

Believe it or not American Smarties are actually like chalky pastel coloured sweets, similar to our Love Heart sweets. 

While Smarties in the UK are chocolates with a hard coloured shell similar to an m&m.  

 

 

 

 

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