Deepfake porn wrecks lives – but it takes just 8 seconds to make image

Deepfake porn wrecks lives – but it takes just 8 seconds to make image

Woman reveals she received rape threats after becoming a victim of deepfake porn – as presenter fronting a new BBC3 documentary says it can take just ‘8 seconds’ to make

  • Kate Isaacs explained she was a victim of deepfake porn after taking on Pornhub
  • Was prepared for backlash, but not for someone to fake a porn video of her 
  • Jess Davies made her own deepfake and found it only took seconds create using an app available to kids 
  • Visit Metro.co.uk to read the full version of this article

Scrolling through her phone, Kate Isaacs opened Twitter and spotted a post that consumed her with terror.

Someone had publicly tweeted an explicit video of what looked like her having sex.

‘This panic just washed over me,’ Kate told Metro.co.uk. ‘I couldn’t think clearly in that moment.

‘Your mind goes into absolute overdrive: ‘But when was that, who am I having sex with, I don’t remember, I don’t think I consented to this.’

‘It’s really, really scary to watch, because you’re thinking, “Oh my god, that’s me, I’m in a porn video and everyone’s going to see – my employers, my grandmother, my friends.”‘ 

Kate Isaacs told Metro.co.uk how ‘panic’ washed over her when she discovered she was a victim of deepfake porn

 

‘You feel vulnerable, because your body is out there, but you have a complete lack of memory of being filmed.’

After her initial shock, Kate realised something even more disturbing – while it was her face in the video, the body attached wasn’t her own.

The 30-year-old campaigner had become a victim of so-called deepfake pornography, the term for pornographic videos made using stolen imagery that is morphed on to pornography footage using software.

Kate, 30, believes that she was targeted due to her 2020 #NotYourPorn campaign, which saw the removal of 10 million non-consenual and child pornogrophy videos on Pornhub.

Journalist Jess Davies presents new BBC3 documentary Deepfake Porn: Could You Be Next? where she learned it takes just seconds to make a deep fake 

‘It’s so awful, because I did expect to be targeted, and before I went on TV for the first time, I went through my phone and deleted any pictures that could be used against me,’ she explains. 

‘But I don’t think I prepared myself for being made into a porn video.’

Even more shockingly, the perpetrators also ‘doxed’ Kate, posting her work and home addresses online.

She adds: ‘I was getting threats like they were going to follow me home while it was dark, and that they were going to rape me, film it and upload it to the Internet.’

Kate shares her experience in new BBC3 documentary Deepfake Porn: Could You Be Next?, hosted by journalist Jess Davies, who looks at how easy it is to create this content.

Within the documentary, Jess, 29, speaks to deepfake makers, ‘Gorkem’, who makes images and videos for clients, and ‘MrDeepFakes’, whose website of the same name garners 13 million visitors every month and has nearly 250,000 members.

Gorkem says: ‘I can see how some women would have psychological harm from this, but on the other hand, they can just say, ‘It’s not me, this has been faked, I can’t suffer any damages from this.

‘I think they should just recognise that and get on with their day.’

Mr Deepfakes agrees: ‘I think that as long as you’re not trying to pass it off as a real thing, that shouldn’t really matter because it’s basically fake.

‘I don’t really feel that consent is required – it’s a fantasy, it’s not real.’

Deepfake victim Kate disagrees. ‘I don’t know what world he’s living in, if he’s able to create these things and think that it doesn’t have any impact on someone’s reputation,’ she says.

As part of her research, Jess also discovered that readily available apps such as FaceMagic – which has an age 12 rating – can create a deepfake in less than a minute. In the documentary, she makes a clip of herself in around eight seconds.

‘You just upload one photo and you can make a deepfake porn video in seconds,’ she explains. 

‘They might not look the most realistic, but it’s still enough to feel the shame and humiliation.’

Visit Metro.co.uk to read the full version of this article 

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