Is it safe to use apple cider vinegar on your skin?

Is it safe to use apple cider vinegar on your skin?

Apple cider vinegar was first used to treat for open wounds, a practice referenced to Biblical times. Apple cider vinegar (ACV) has since been used for a number of different ailments, with many attesting to the kitchen cupboard staple being full of incredible healing properties.

However, these claims are not backed up with much scientific evidence, making many wary of whether or not they should be using the acidic mixture – created by fermenting sugar from apples – on their skin and especially their faces.

The strong smell of the product is the direct result of the acetic acid produced during the fermentation, a substance that has antibacterial and antifungal properties, which are known to help clean skin and prevent infections.

However, when it comes to ACV, many studies have not found much evidence that the product has a positive effect on the skin.

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Can you use apple cider vinegar on your skin?

Many consider using ACV to improve their skin, hoping to strengthen their skin barrier, which is already slightly acidic.

This barrier keeps the skin healthy and soft, which means it appears dry and is prone to irritation when damaged.

It has been reported using diluted ACV on your skin can restore its acidity and support the skin barrier.

However, the jury’s out on this one, as a number of contrasting studies have found improvements, while others none at all, with some even reporting more skin irritation after using the acid.

Which skin problems is ACV typically associated with treating?

There is still no conclusive evidence that ACV can treat skin conditions.

But it’s widely thought that some might still experience benefits from using it for conditions that include eczema or even sunburn.

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Some people who don’t have skin issues are also known to use ACV as a skin cleanser or toner, usually diluted with water and applied with a cotton pad.

The chemicals within apple cider vinegar can cause skin cells to shrink, tightening the skin.

This makes it a regular choice of older women, who have used the much-loved kitchen cupboard item for years to prevent wrinkles.

Due to its chemical makeup, ACV is often compared to the famed salycilic and glycolic acid which are often used in some of the high street’s best skincare products.

Many skincare fans have suggested that diluted apple cider vinegar can also be used as a chemical peel to bring the salon to home.

However, it’s important to ensure it’s always done with care.

Those who suffer from skin conditions such as acne often turn to chemical peels, but the misuse of any acidic product on sensitive skin can be disastrous.

To avoid complications, you should always discuss with a skin professional before using ACV in this way.

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