Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power ratings suspended by Amazon

Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power ratings suspended by Amazon

Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power ratings suspended by Amazon leading many to wonder if it is getting ‘review bombed’… after low audience marks on Rotten Tomatoes

  • The series currently sits at a 34percent average audience score on film and television aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes 
  • Many have wondered if the move was made by the media giant to avoid being ‘review bombed’ 
  • Many had noticed there were 0 reviews on the Amazon Prime Video listing as the first two episodes of the Lord Of The Rings prequel were set to stream on Friday
  • Asource told The Hollywood Reporter on Friday that reviews ‘are being held 72 hours to help weed out trolls and to ensure each review is legitimate’
  • The series currently has a very impressive Tomatometer score of 84percent when it comes to critics on Rotten Tomatoes with the audience score a whopping 50percent below that 
  • Many of the audience reviewers pointed out the diversity of the cast and their dislike for the female protagonist Galadriel (Played by Morfydd Clark) for the reasoning behind their low rating 

Amazon has suspended user reviews on it’s highly-anticipated series The Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power.

As the series currently sits at a 34percent average audience score on film and television aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes many have wondered if the move was made by the media giant to avoid being ‘review bombed’

Many had noticed there were 0 reviews on the Amazon Prime Video listing as the first two episodes of the Lord Of The Rings prequel were set to stream on Friday.

Hmm: Amazon has suspended user reviews on it’s highly-anticipated series The Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power

Taking a stand: Many had noticed there were 0 reviews on the Amazon Prime Video listing as the first two episodes of the Lord Of The Rings prequel were set to stream on Friday

The series currently has a very impressive Tomatometer score of 84percent when it comes to critics on Rotten Tomatoes with the audience score a whopping 50percent below that.

Many of the audience reviewers pointed out the diversity of the cast and their dislike for the female protagonist Galadriel (Played by Morfydd Clark) for the reasoning behind their low rating. 

One user gave it a 0.5 rating out of 5 as they explained: ‘1/2 star for just the visuals, but the majority of the characters were awful. Especially Galadriel, what were they thinking with this one? She was awful’

Not pleased: As the series currently sits at a 34percent average audience score on film and television aggregator site Rotten Tomatoes many have wondered if the move was made by the media giant to avoid being ‘review bombed’

Moving on: Many of the audience reviewers pointed out the diversity of the cast and their dislike for the female protagonist Galadriel (Played by Morfydd Clark) for the reasoning behind their low rating

Another gave it the same score and wrote: ‘Absolutely abysmal. Not Tolkien, not Lord of the Rings. Not every single piece of media art needs to be re imagined for a diverse modern audience.’

 ‘Review bombing’ is an online phenomenon of a group of online users posting numerous negative reviews due to perceived cultural or political issues rather than the actual quality of the work.

It is not exactly a new phenomenon as the all-female 2016 Ghostbusters film was met with tons of backlash. 

One user gave it 0.5 stars out of five and wrote: ‘Absolutely abysmal. Not Tolkien, not Lord of the Rings. Not every single piece of media art needs to be re imagined for a diverse modern audience’

The disparity in critics to user reviews did not just happen on aggregate site RottenTomatoes as Metacritic also received similar treatment as their ‘metascore’ based on 37 critic reviews sits at 71 while the user score is a mere 2.3 based on 768 ratings

More recently Disney+ series She-Hulk was at the receiving end of ‘review bombing.’

 Regarding Amazon’s approach to the Lord Of The Rings prequel, a source told The Hollywood Reporter on Friday that reviews ‘are being held 72 hours to help weed out 

‘The source later claimed Prime Video started the policy this summer on all its shows.’trolls and to ensure each review is legitimate. 

The Lord of The Rings: The Rings of Power: What did the critics say?

The Guardian

Rating:

The visual splendour of this rich, gorgeous Tolkien drama will make you gawp throughout it makes House of Dragon look amateur.

I love Galadriel (Morfydd Clark) the fighter. She is valiant, flawed and haughty, as bloody-minded as she is brilliant, scarred by the horrors of war. 

This is enormously enjoyable TV, a cinematic feast. 

Entertainment Weekly

Amazon’s prequel is kind of a catastrophe.

It takes six or seven things everyone remembers from the famous movie trilogy, adds a water tank, makes nobody fun, teases mysteries that aren’t mysteries, and sends the best character on a pointless detour. 

The Independent

Rating:

The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power sets out its sprawling epic fantasy credentials right from the off: even its title seems like it could be split into multiple instalments.

While The King Of Power might be a brand new story, it still has plenty of authentic Tolkienesque charm to go along with the best production value money can buy.

Variety

From this prelude onward, The Rings of Power narrative adopts a solemn and awestruck approach. 

The first two episodes are admirably concise and compelling in their introductions.

Empire

Rating:

Lavish and sweeping, The Rings Of Power puts its money where its mouth is. 

The immensely fun Dwarves are Scottish-tinged and larger than life, canny and caring all at once.

It might take a second to get accustomed to these new characters, but the signs are that it will be worthwhile.

NME

Rating:

‘Don’t the great tales never end?’ asks hobbit Samwise Gamgee during a slower moment in The Lord Of The Rings. He’s talking about his own journey through J. R. R. Tolkien’s epic fantasy world – but he might as well be referring to the franchise itself.

As a start, this is an excellent one.

The Times 

Despite the inventiveness that the creators have had to deploy to populate Tolkien’s world with fresh, non-canonical characters, the whole thing has the vibe of terrified executives carrying an exceedingly expensive vase across a slippery floor.

Perhaps two episodes aren’t enough to judge, and we are indeed gearing up for the greatest and most gripping fantasy TV series ever made. But I’m certainly not there yet. 

The Mirror 

Rating:

I’ve got a pretty good inkling of how Amazon is hoping to make its money back. By flogging thousands of expensive big screen TVs – so viewers can truly appreciate the full cinematic wonder of this J.R.R. Tolkien masterpiece. 

The special effects in this prequel could very well blow his Peter Jackson’s pair of Tolkien trilogies out of the water – and that’s before we’ve even seen the most spectacular of the promised battle scenes.

The Sun 

It’s ok but not wizard.

It is the beautiful New Zealand scenery, intricate sets and fantastical costumes that are a major highlight of the first two episodes. They are a happy distraction from the plot and characters, which come thick and fast.

The history behind this series is rushed through at such a pace only JRR Tolkien devotees could properly keep up.

What is clear, though, is that Amazon Prime Video has found someone truly precious in lead actress Morfydd Clark. 

 

The disparity in critics to user reviews did not just happen on aggregate site RottenTomatoes as Metacritic also received similar treatment.

Their ‘metascore’ based on 37 critic reviews sits at 71 while the user score is a mere 2.3 based on 768 ratings.

Meanwhile fans on social media  were left underwhelmed by the newly released first two episodes, set within the Second Age of Middle-earth, thousands of years before the events shown in both ‘The Hobbit’ and ‘Lord of the Rings’ books.

Forging: But fans have been left underwhelmed by the newly released first two episodes, set within the Second Age of Middle-earth, thousands of years before the events shown in both The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings books

Disappointed: Excited viewers were eagerly awaiting the first two episodes to drop at 2 a.m. GMT on Friday morning, but appeared disappointed by the results after binge-watching the one-hour installments as it received very mixed reviews

The eight-episode series begins during a time of peace, but will depict events that play a huge role in the LOTR and Hobbit franchise, including the forging of the Rings of Power.

Excited viewers were eagerly awaiting the first two episodes to drop at 2am GMT on Friday morning, but appeared disappointed by the results after binge-watching the one-hour instalments as it received very mixed reviews.

Diehard LOTR fans took to Twitter to admit they ‘had trouble’ even getting through the first episodes of Amazon Prime’s billion-dollar Tolkien epic, while others described the characters and plot as ‘dull.’

One viewer wrote: ‘I’ve loved everything The Lord of the Rings for decades now but I had trouble getting through the first episode of The Rings of Power. I’m still going to watch all of the eps before passing judgment on the show as a whole. #theringsofpower.’

Another said: ‘I tried to start the lord of the rings trilogy last night (for no reason at all). i got the best sleep i had in months.’

‘I am awestruck’: However, not all fans were left underwhelmed by the Amazon series, as others took to social media to comment on how ‘nostalgic’ the series was, while others urged people not to make early judgements on the show

A third commented: ‘This show looks very pretty, but most of the characters are dull which is unfortunate cuz Lord of the Rings usually has engaging characters. It was ehh I kind of struggled at points to keep watching since most of the characters are boring. I’ll keep watching.’

While a fourth added: ‘The Snow Troll was well-designed. Some scenes felt like raw Lord of the Rings Online nostalgia. That’s about the only positives I’ve experienced so far, an episode an a half in.’

And a fifth fumed: ‘If the concept of secondhand embarrassment were a TV show, it would be #TheRingsOfPower.’

Not all fans were left underwhelmed by the Amazon series, however, as others took to social media to comment on how ‘nostalgic’ the series was, while others urged people not to make early judgements on the show.

One person tweeted: ‘The lord of the rings #TheRingsofPower is something else: so much nostalgia! Wow.’

CHRISTOPHER STEVENS reviews The Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power: No turkey, however bloated and stupid, could ever be big enough to convey the mesmerising awfulness of Amazon’s billion dollar Tolkien epic 

The Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power

Rating:

Turkey is not the word. No turkey, however bloated and stupid, could ever be big enough to convey the mesmerising awfulness of Amazon’s billion dollar Tolkien epic.

This is a disaster dragon – plucked, spatchcocked, with a tankerload of Paxo stuffed up its fundament, roasted and served with soggy sprouts.

The Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power (Amazon Prime) is so staggeringly bad, it’s hilarious. Everything about it is ill-judged to a spectacular extreme.

The cliche-laden script, the dire acting, the leaden pace, the sheer inconsistency and confusion as it lurches between styles – where do we start?

Review: The Lord Of The Rings: The Rings Of Power is so staggeringly bad, it’s hilarious. Everything about it is ill-judged to a spectacular extreme (Galadriel played by Morfydd Clark)

Let’s start with the budget: a billion dollars. Let that sink in. One thousand million bucks, about £860,000,000, such a colossal investment even for Amazon that industry rumour says the brand is gambling its entire future as a film production company.

If this show fails, say insiders, executives could be forced to shut down Amazon Studios.

The book rights alone cost $250 million. And what did Amazon get for that? This is not a remake of Lord Of The Rings or The Hobbit. This is a prequel, based on the appendixes – the reams of footnotes dumped by J.R.R. Tolkien at the end of his Rings trilogy, chronicling millennia of turgid historical fantasy. That’s right… the unreadable bits.

Panned: The cliche-laden script, the dire acting, the leaden pace, the sheer inconsistency and confusion as it lurches between styles – where do we start? (pictured an Orc)

Whoever thought that was a wise buy must have been smashed out of their minds on miruvor, the elvish liquor.

There’s no doubt we can see the budget. It casts a throbbing glow over the screen like a chestful of gold. Ultra-high definition computer graphics paint ivory cities in mountain passes and conjure gigantic monsters in palaces of dark magic.

But magnificent visuals are meaningless if nobody knows who the audience is meant to be. And it’s impossible to guess whether The Rings Of Power is meant for children, for hardcore fans or for general viewers – because it fails them all.

Big money, big problems! One thousand million bucks, about £860,000,000, such a colossal investment even for Amazon that industry rumour says the brand is gambling its entire future as a film production company.

Risky business: If this show fails, say insiders, executives could be forced to shut down Amazon Studios (pictured Durin IV played by Owain Arthur)

One fight sequence features elf princess Galadriel in acrobatic action against an angry troll, who pops up from off-stage like an adversary in a Dungeons & Dragons boardgame.

Galadriel (Morfydd Clark) cartwheels and whirls her enchanted sword before despatching the giant fiend with a bloodless blow. It’s highly stylised, like a Japanese manga cartoon.

An episode later, the healer Bronwyn (Nazanin Boniadi) and her son fight an orc, and this time the violence is as brutal as anything in Game Of Thrones.

How much! The book rights alone cost $250 million. This is a prequel, based on the appendixes – the reams of footnotes dumped by J.R.R. Tolkien (pictured Poppy Proudfellow played by Megan Richards and Elanor ‘Nori’ Brandyfoot by Markella Kavenagh)

They stab it, spear it, run it through, hang it and finally saw through its neck with a knife – before Bronwyn, soaked in blood, displays the head as a trophy. Small children and persons of a nervous disposition should not watch.

Then the tale flies back to the Harfoots, prehistoric hobbits that wear garlands of acorns and dress in rags, as though they’ve escaped from the set of Worzel Gummidge.

Led by Lenny Henry as Sadoc, the Harfoots talk in a garble of Jamaican, Irish and Zummerset accents. They’re loveable and funny, in a slapstick way. Poppy Proudfellow (Megan Richards) trips on an expedition to scrump blackberries, and falls flat in a puddle.

When she lifts her muddy face to the camera, like Oliver Hardy, she sighs, ‘Enchanting.’

Harfoot-land is cute… until old Mr Brandyfoot slips and snaps his leg, with a crack that would make the cast of Casualty wince.

Opinion: Whoever thought that was a wise buy must have been smashed out of their minds on miruvor, the elvish liquor

One disconnected style follows wildly after another. A static scene in which elves journey by ship is conceived as a PreRaphaelite painting – each actor stock still in silver armour, swords clasped to their chests, long hair rippling, eyes fixed on the horizon in pious awe. Inspired by a flock of birds, they lift their voices in a heavenly choir.

There’s a lot of this quasi-religious imagery. The first episode begins with a cod Bible reading: ‘There was a time when the world was so young, there had not been a sunrise, but even then there was light.’

Popular culture invents blether like this to replace real religion. It’s scientology for the superhero movie era.

‘Year gave way to year, century gave way to century,’ the narrator continues, and already this reviewer was giving way to laughter. Soon, every fresh clunker provoked such hoots that I had to keep pausing to gather my composure.

‘It is said that the wine of victory is sweetest for those in whose bitter trials it is fermented,’ says the elf Elrond (Robert Aramayo) to Galadriel. And I’m off again.

Graphics: There’s no doubt we can see the budget. It casts a throbbing glow over the screen like a chestful of gold. Ultra-high definition computer graphics paint ivory cities in mountain passes and conjure gigantic monsters in palaces of dark magic [pictured L-R) Gil-galad (Benjamin Walker), Galadriel and Elrond (Robert Aramayo)]

‘If but a whisper of a rumour of the threat you perceive proves true…’ he goes on, until I’m weeping with laughter.

Bronwyn and her boyfriend Arondir the elf share some marvellous exchanges: ‘I must follow the passage,’ he tells her, pointing to an underground cavern.

‘You don’t know what’s down there!’ she cries.

‘That,’ he replies portentously, ‘is the reason I must go.’

Without a shred of irony, Galadriel declares to her elf platoon, ‘The order is given! We march at first light!’

She can’t have seen the wonderful skit by Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon in The Trip, where they spend a car journey wondering why warriors in terrible historical dramas always ‘leave at first light’ (‘They never leave at 9.30-ish.’)

Bronwyn hasn’t watched it either. She urges villagers to flee: ‘If there are any of you here who want to live, we make for the elven tower at first light.’

Even when there’s no dialogue, some of the acting is abysmal. Galadriel’s elf patrol, caught in a snowstorm, battle their way across the screen with their arms outstretched like a troupe of mimes.

At least they’re not talking. Most of the elf scenes are rigid, as two characters in robes take it in turns to dump mounds of exposition over each other’s heads.

‘An alliance with the dwarves would be the diplomatic achievement of the age,’ Celebrimbor (Charles Edwards from Downton Abbey) tells Elrond.

Cue a visit to dwarf-world, where Elrond challenges the prince (Owain Arthur) to a rock-breaking competition. One of them hits a rock with a hammer! Then the other one hits a rock with a hammer! This goes on for some time.

If the cast list seems a little obscure, that’s intentional. Aside from Sir Lenny, the only well-known star is Peter Mullan, who plays the king of a dwarfs.

Hiring an experienced and subtle actor, even if he is in a massive prosthetic nose and filmed to appear four feet tall, might seem canny decision.

It isn’t. Mullan’s talent simply highlights how woeful everything and everyone else is. The effect is like sticking Richard Burton in an am-dram pantomime.

Burton was famously expensive, of course. Cleopatra, in which he starred with future wife Elizabeth Taylor, cost $31m… the most expensive film ever, in 1963.

Think of it – a mere $31m! That would barely buy you a pair of Lenny Henry’s hairy fake feet.

Failed: But magnificent visuals are meaningless if nobody knows who the audience is meant to be. And it’s impossible to guess whether The Rings Of Power is meant for children, for hardcore fans or for general viewers – because it fails them all

 

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