Thousands of ISIS sleeper cells ‘could attack Britain’ in revenge

Thousands of ISIS sleeper cells ‘could attack Britain’ in revenge

Thousands of ISIS sleeper cells ‘could attack Britain’ in revenge for the fall of the ‘caliphate’ in Syria

  • Fears rising over fighters who are still loyal to ISIS following destruction in Syria
  • It is thought that thousands of sleeper cells could continue fight on Western soil
  • Forces fighting ISIS in Syria reveal how British insurgents were among deadliest
  • Group’s leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi still at large and could inspire more fighters

Thousands of ISIS sleeper cells could be ready to launch revenge attacks on Britain in response to the fall of the ‘caliphate’ in Syria, it has been warned.

Fighters still loyal to ISIS following its destruction at the hands of Kurdish-led forces are now thought to be prepared to continue the fight on Western soil.

That was the warning issued by the Syrian Democratic Forces, which said ‘thousands of sleepers’ had disappeared and fallen from its radar falling ISIS’s defeat in Syria.

It is feared tens of thousands of ‘Cubs of the Caliphate’ currently in refugee camps could join the next generation of ISIS fighters ready to strike back at its enemies. 

Thousands of ISIS sleeper cells could be ready to launch revenge attacks on Britain in response to the fall of the ‘caliphate’ in Syria (the Syrian town of Kafraya is shown in March) 

Syrian Democratic Forces commander Mervan Kamishlo told the Mirror: ‘There still thousands of sleepers here. When we succeeded militarily they disappeared.’

He added: ‘They still think they are a state. Their sleeper network is a mafia. They will come back. 

‘But the most dangerous of the fighters were not locals Arab fighters – they were Europeans, yes the British. I fought against them.

‘They were most dangerous. Clever, well educated and that they gave up so much back home shows commitment.’

Syrian Democratic Forces declared a ‘total elimination’ of the jihadist group in March after flushing out suicidal jihadists from the holdout in Baghouz, eastern Syria.

The terrorist group’s bloody last stand saw male and female fanatics hiding in caves as US-backed forces rained down an overnight barrage.

The world’s most wanted man Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who declared himself the tyrant of the regime in 2014, was not among their number and is still at large (pictured in 2014)

Pictured: ISIS weapons seized by Syrian Democratic Forces shortly after the last Syrian stronghold fell in March

The world’s most wanted man Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who declared himself the tyrant of the regime in 2014, was not among their number and is still at large. 

The 47-year-old Iraqi recluse, who suffers from diabetes, has been rumoured to have been wounded or killed several times in the past.

But his whereabouts have never been confirmed and a $25million price remains for his scalp.

Victorious SDF fighters played Arabic techno music and danced arm-in-arm to taunt IS survivors.

Their brutal regime had imposed a total ban on music, punishable by flogging or even death.

At its height, ISIS ruled more than seven million people and made billions selling oil on the black market.

More than 11,000 SDF fighters have died in the four-year offensive, while an estimated 100,000 coalition air strikes have taken place.

This includes more than 1,700 by RAF assets, while 1,100 British Special Forces and personnel have been deployed across Syria and Iraq.

Pictured: smoke rising from the final stronghold of ISIS in Baghouz, eastern Syria, in March

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