Chelsea footballer Antonio Rudiger gets driving ban for speeding

Chelsea footballer Antonio Rudiger gets driving ban for speeding

Chelsea footballer Antonio Rudiger gets driving ban for speeding at more than 100mph in court hearing held behind closed doors

  • Defender’s limited edition Mercedes sports car pulled over by police in January
  • Footballer was going an average speed of 106mph, reaching 109mph at times
  • Tried under a single justice procedure, which means the hearing was in private 

Chelsea footballer Antonio Rudiger received a two-week driving ban for speeding at more than 100mph in a court hearing held behind closed doors. 

The German defender’s limited edition Mercedes sports car was pulled over by police back in January on a two-mile stretch of the A3 in south London.

A police officer told a magistrate in Bromley that the footballer was going at an average speed of 106mph, reaching 109mph at times. 


The German defender’s limited edition Mercedes sports car was pulled over by police back in January on a two-mile stretch of the A3 in south London. He is seen training in February (left) and posing next to a car 

Rudiger offered no excuse for his speeding to police and pleaded guilty to the charges in May using an online form, according to The Standard. 

The footballer was sentenced on June 25 to a 14-day driving ban and told to pay a £660 fine as well as £166 in court costs. 

The hearing was held behind closed doors as part of a single justice procedure, so reporters or members of the public were no able to attend. 

Neither the prosecution nor the defence is present, and any submissions form the defendant have to be made online.  

What is a single justice procedure? 

A single justice procedure is a money-saving procedure used to deal with minor offences without the need for a defendant to go to court.

Defendants are given notices of the charges they face and asked for their plea, which can be made by post.

Those who plead guilty can choose whether to go to court and appear before a single magistrate, who will make a decision over sentence. 

Those who plead not guilty have to go to court to give evidence to the magistrate. Defendants have 21 days to respond to notices and if they do not, a magistrate can make a decision without their involvement.

The money-saving procedure allows a single magistrate and court official to get through lots of cases at once, sometimes hundreds. 

Those who plead guilty can choose whether to go to court and appear before a single magistrate, who will make a decision over sentence. 

Rudiger, began his career at VfB Stuttgart, is currently recovering from a knee injury. 

His Chelsea teammates Callum Hudson-Odoi and Ross Barkley were caught speeding on the A3 in the same week in January.      

Last year, a mystery Premier League footballer was clocked doing 125mph while undertaking a marked police car. 

Officers pulled over the star, who is believed to play for a Premier League club, between junction 22 and 20 of the westbound carriageway of the M25 at 9.20am on December 30. 

The video of him criss-crossing Britain’s busiest motorway at high speed was posted online by the road policing team who cover Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire.

Officers later refused to release the footballer’s name.  

Rudiger celebrates with the trophy after the UEFA Europa League final at The Olympic Stadium in Baku on May 29

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